Reading matters……..

the-forsyte-saga-complete-collection.jpgI purchased this because something, I don’t know what, made me think of the BBC TV series in the 60’s which starred Nyree Dawn Porter, Eric Porter and Kenneth More amongst others. Everybody but everybody was glued to the TV at peak time on a Saturday evening…all ages, and no-one went for their Saturday night out without seeing it. No catch-up in those days. The book, which is really a trilogy – ‘The Man of Property’‘In Chancery’ and ‘To Let’ is joined together by two short stories ‘Indian Summer of a Forsyte’ and ‘Awakening’ . Altogether just under half a million words made this an epic read. And it is of the highest quality. Since he wrote it all in the 30’s Galsworthy has had a pretty poor press with the critics, but the public have ignored that and loved it. In the last decade or two the critics have come round to the public’s view. Interesting! Basically it is about the varying relationships of one very large upper-middle class family in High Victorian and then Edwardian England. As well as extremely good characterisation, and plots which you want to follow to their outcome, the background is fascinating as many of the main themes of Great Britain in those days are explored – from Empire and foreign travel through to politics, the introduction of the motor car and so much else besides. I cannot speak of the novel too highly. And the short story ‘Indian Summer of a Forsyte’ is so memorable a description of what it is to grow old and not be able to do the things you want, and at the same time the anguish that comes from unrequited love that it will stay with you for ever. What a read.

A Week in the New Forest…….October 2019….Part 2

20191016_112119 copy.jpgAnother day, another nice thing to do. This time a gentle 2 or 3 mile walk along the river from our house to Bucklers Hard.  Board walks in some places to avoid getting wet.20191016_112522 copy.jpgAnd brilliant views of what is a very scenic river indeed.20191016_114824 copy.jpg20191016_115154 copy.jpgAt Bucklers Hard itself we enjoyed the Georgian village, once a thriving shipbuilding village where ships for Nelson’s fleet at Trafalgar were built……now, as the blurb says,  ‘a tranquil haven’. At the river end of the Buckler’s Hard high street was The Master Builder’s House Hotel where we enjoyed a refreshing drink in the gardens…….20191016_123701 copy.jpgWe hadn’t been to the seaside yet on this holiday, so off we went in the afternoon to Milford on Sea, a very pleasant location with a good, noisy, shingly beach and a distant view of The Needles. 20191016_154905 copy.jpgI’m sure all these colourful beach huts will be open on a sunny day……..20191016_155431 copy.jpgBut we enjoyed ourselves ……….skimming stones amongst other things….20191016_165329-copy.jpg20191016_155113 copy.jpgand the children’s play area had some unusually good activities…20191016_162850 copy.jpgand what nicer at the seaside than to have fish and chips on the promenade?20191016_174631 copy.jpegOur cottage being in Beaulieu it would have been ridiculous to have gone home without visiting Palace House and its world-famous car museum. But a stately home, gardens and a car museum for a 5 year old? As it happens, we need not have worried. Aiisha enjoyed the visit as much as anybody, as everywhere there had been a huge attempt made to keep things family-friendly.20191017_113031 copy.jpgWe went in the car museum first, and not only was it very nostalgic for people who had themselves owned an Austin Healey, a Zephyr, and a Zodiac, and an Austin A35, but it was all incredibly interesting , and there was always something to capture our attention.20191017_120713 copy.jpg20191017_120728 copy.jpg20191017_121503 copy.jpg20191017_121454 copy.jpg20191017_121623 copy.jpgand didn’t my family look absolutely splendid in Edwardian motoring gear………20191017_121953 copy.jpgalthough the wind can play havoc with the driver’s hat!20191017_122046 copy.jpgOver 16 million Model T Fords were manufactured before production ceased in 1927 and interestingly British cars came in blue and green before black became standard in 1914. In the 1920’s grey, red and grey were offered. The first British factory had opened in my home town of Manchester in 1911. The model on show here cost £135 and did 40mph……..20191017_122750 copy.jpgAiisha loved the original Chitty Chitty Bang Bang car (amongst many other things aimed at children)….20191017_122907 copy.jpgand would really have loved to have had a go in this Atco junior trainer designed in the 1930’s to give children basic experience of road craft. Everything is as in a full size car but miniaturised with the exception of there being just 2 gears forward and back.20191017_123459 copy.jpgMind you we did find the interactive driving games exciting….20191017_130632-copy-2.jpgand we got to sit on an old bus…………20191017_124831 copy 2.jpgand then after a great lunch have a trip around the grounds in a replica 1912 London bus. It stopped at the house…….. 20191017_132532 copy 2.jpgso we decided to get off and have a look around the historic home of the Montagu family, and later at the ruins of the Abbey………..I can’t stress too highly how accessible everything was and how involving. The house, although stuffed with the usual expensive objets and pictures and furniture and so on, was different from any other I have been in, in that not only was photography allowed, but you could touch or get close to virtually everything. Amazing.20191017_135019 copy 2.jpg desktop-attraction_Day-Visits-Abbey_w870px_h475px.jpgOne surviving building from the Abbey – the Domus – was once the living quarters of the lay brothers………..20191017_163328.jpgAnd in here were displayed a whole series of embroideries designed by Belinda, Lady Montagu which depict the history of the Abbey. They were exquisite.20191017_163550-copy-2.jpg20191017_163511-copy-2.jpgWhat else did we do? Visit the Top Gear museum where all the old episodes were showing (of the proper Top Gear with Jeremy et al) alongside the actual vehicles featured………good fun.20191017_153256 copy 2.jpg20191017_153928 copy 2.jpg20191017_154316 copy 2.jpgThis was followed by a go for all of us on the full-scale simulator – racing round the Dunsfold Park test track in a Caterham and a Bugatti Veyron. Exciting.20191017_160527-copy-2.jpgWe then went for a trip on the mile-long monorail, the oldest in England on a sedate tour of the attraction from above, with sweeping views of the grounds and gardens before passing right through the roof of the National Motor Museum to give another take on things.20191017_155246 copy 2.jpg20191017_155652 copy 2.jpgWe just had time then to stroll round the gardens, which were lovely…..20191017_161639 copy 2.jpeg20191017_162515 copy 2.jpgA really really good time was had by all, and I can’t recommend this place enough. A fantastic week in a lovely house in a lovely part of the country.

On our way home F. and I diverted a short distance to visit the museum of the Tolpuddle Martyrs. Always interesting to see how the downtrodden were able to secure basic rights due to the bravery and persistence of a few heroes. Small but worth visit.Martyrs colour_0.jpg

A Week in the New Forest…October 2019

20191016_110618 copy.jpgA week in the New Forest in October in a house in the trees with rain forecast every day didn’t seem to augur too well. In the event the rain held off at critical times and at other times we didn’t mind getting wet. After all, being British, we accept bad weather with the equanimity it deserves for what it is. Getting wet is not something you seek, but when you are wet, well you’re wet and that’s sort of ok.20191013_155135 copy.jpgWe were all converging on the house from different directions. F and me in our car from Cornwall, Katherine and Aiisha from Southampton airport, and David and Jennifer from London. On our way we called into Forde Abbey as it was on our route and free to HHA members. A good call for lunch. Forde Abbey is a former Cistercian monastery dating back to the early 12th century. One of the richest abbeys in England it was of course quickly dissolved by Henry VIII. It then had a rich and varied history as a private home. Its first lay owner entertained the Duke of Monmouth as he planned his rebellion and ended up in the Tower of London, and Jeremy Bentham also rented the house for a period during the 19th century, and did much of his writing here.

It was in fact converted into quite a palatial family home during the mid 17th century. The house has exquisitely ornate plaster ceilings throughout the state rooms, together with a collection of very impressive Mortlake tapestries woven from cartoons drawn by Raphael for the Sistine Chapel. It is indeed a unique family house.

Throughout the 20th century the 30 acres of gardens that surround the  house have been transformed by the present owners. The gardens are now a diverse and breathtaking landscape fit for the house that they surround, from the productive Kitchen Garden, to the Arboretum, Rock Garden, Herbaceous Borders, Bog Garden, and Woodland Garden.

20191011_135552 copy.jpg20191011_122337 copy.jpgAnd with it being near to Halloween they had lavish displays everywhere of pumpkins of all shapes and sizes…20191011_135300 copy.jpg20191011_122314 copy.jpgA fleeting but fascinating visit. Now, the clans having gathered and made ourselves at home, we set out on the first full day for Lymington as I knew the market was there on Saturdays….the journey there gave us some inkling of just how many ponies we would see in the following days…..they are everywhere, and I do mean everywhere, (and very friendly).20191012_104618 copy.jpgWe loved Lymington, who wouldn’t, and the busy and engaging market stretched in two rows a long long way down the main shopping street, and was great. We also found amazing bargains in a charity shop where we purchased 5 or 6 games suitable for children and adults (bearing in mind the weather).20191012_115926 copy.jpgAt the end of the main run a couple of very pretty cobbled streets took us down to the harbour….where we availed ourselves of some refreshments and lunch.20191012_120315 copy.jpg20191012_120639 copy.jpg20191012_125220 copy.jpgA great place all round. A bit later in the day we walked along country paths to Beaulieu where we encountered rather a lot of donkeys (also friendly).20191012_170023 copy.jpgNow why didn’t the others follow the example of this one sheltering under a large archway? Mind you, they do always seem to look sad….20191012_165927-copy.jpgBack ‘home’ it was time for a belated birthday cake for Katherine and Aiisha which went down well, and after it some of the games we had bought.20191012_193433 copy.jpgThe ‘Load the Camel’ game was hilarious and we played with it lots of times. When overloaded it kind of jumped into life shocking me more than anyone every single time, and scaring poor Aiisha!20191012_200713.jpegSunday was to be our adventure day. We walked to the Outdoor Activities Centre at Beaulieu….20191013_092431 copy.jpgand prepared for our bike rides. Very very enjoyable if a little scary (as one of the main cycle routes was closed for pony counting!!) leaving us no option but to travel on busy main roads. 20191013_100400 copy.jpg20191013_110905 copy.jpg20191013_110942 copy.jpgHaving completed our rides we prepared for canoeing. As you can see the rain was not putting anyone off.20191013_122835 copy.jpg20191013_123134 copy.jpgWe travelled upstream to the weir at Beaulieu where we called into a little inlet for cups of hot chocolate provided by our instructor Chris. He was a terrific guide pointing out lots of rivery things, and always aware of which birds and features we were seeing…20191013_130959 copy.jpg20191013_132324 copy.jpgA great day all round, and highly recommended.20191013_135751 copy.jpgAlways nice to have a pint or whatever in the local Beaulieu pub after our exertions……20191013_172705 copy.jpg20191013_173736 copy.jpgAnd a nice sky on our walk home.20191013_182531-EFFECTS copy.jpgAnother day took us to Portsmouth where we were to see the Mary Rose (something I have always wanted to do). The dockland surroundings were very impressive and we glimpsed some very famous ships before entering a very active repair and building shed……..20191014_134238 copy.jpg20191014_134906 copy.jpgwhere we had a very decent lunch ( and did a bit of colouring)…..20191014_135313 copy.jpg20191014_144536 copy.jpgGetting closer to the Mary Rose museum we were intrigued and impressed by Nelson’s very own HMS Victory…20191014_152029 copy.jpg20191014_152051_001 copy.jpg20191014_152134 copy.jpgand in between it and the Mary Rose was the iconic 25ft statue ‘Embracing Peace’, also known as Unconditional Surrender. This European replica of the US based original has been touring Europe, the original statue famously depicting an embrace in Times Square, New York, at the end of the World War II, between a returning serviceman and a local girl. Very impressive indeed.20191014_152331 copy.jpgAt last the Museum. We didn’t really know what to expect and whether it would be suitable for a 5 year-old. We were not to be disappointed. The ship itself at the centre, of course, of the museum is encircled by a “Hot Box” chamber that houses it whilst a highly technical drying out process takes place. Spotlit in different places at different times it is magical to see, and surrounding it on several floors equivalent to the decks are many of the items recovered from the ship which tell us so much about the England of Henry VIII and those who worked in its navy.20191014_154808 copy.jpgItems which show the essence of a very powerful warship of its day, and a warship which moreover had already had a successful career of 34 years (news to me).20191014_154911 copy.jpgAnd items which show us how its crew lived – and died.20191014_154036 copy.jpg20191014_155734-copy.jpgThese are items from the carpenters store….20191014_155012 copy.jpgand in their midst something which to me was the most astonishing thing of all…..20191014_155639 copy.jpg….this multi-purpose tool. How incredible, a Swiss Army knife of the sixteenth century.20191014_155644 copy.jpegThere was so much to see that we only were able to have a good look at a tiny fraction…..20191014_163011 copy.jpg20191014_161553 copy.jpgWho could not be impressed by the galley with its two large, brick built ovens each with a huge copper cauldron on the top. Meat and fish were boiled in these to feed the 400 or 500 men on board. No chimneys – the smoke was trapped in a box-like area above the ovens, where it could be used to flavour fish and meat.20191014_162851.jpgThe adults were entranced. And as for Aiisha, there were interactive games..20191014_160048 copy.jpgskeletons to rebuild…..20191014_162509 copy.jpg20191014_161419 copy.jpgclothes to dress up in….20191014_154113 copy.jpgfood casks to see what people eat….20191014_163216.jpgand a kind of treasure hunt where successfully spotting various things all around the museum was rewarded with a certificate and badge. What a successful day. And we can return any time in the next year – we will!20191014_164047 copy.jpgYet another day found us at Poultons Park a theme park like no other and the #1 UK theme park as voted for by TripAdvisor, Mumsnet and Which readers, and most definitely by the Smith family. It was quite exceptional. Our first job on entering was to get ourselves fed and watered. And I can honestly say that the curry I had was one of the very best (and cheapest) curries I have ever had. Terrific to find such quality in a theme park.20191015_105619 copy 2.jpegAnd what then struck us before anything else was the beauty of the surroundings with Japanese gardens, dinosaur jungles, 20191015_110406 2 copy.jpg20191015_111746 2 copy.jpg20191015_114611.jpgand lots of birds………20191015_114258 copy 2.jpgBut of course some of us had come for the rides, and they were great. Naturally neither F. nor I  ventured  onto the more extreme, adrenelin-inducing rides but we did try some of the more moderate ones which gave us ample flavour of what theme park rides are about…..20191015_125745-copy.jpg20191015_110951 copy.jpg20191015_112839 copy.jpg20191015_112908 2 copy.jpgAnd what I found fascinating was the way that Aiisha not only got super enjoyment from the big rides, but also from the gentler ones too……20191015_113209 copy.jpg20191015_121901 copy.jpg20191015_121526 copy.jpeg20191015_123521 copy.jpg20191015_125501 copy.jpg20191015_130720-2-copy.jpg20191015_131025 copy.jpgAnd at the end, to cap it all off there was Peppa Pig’s World, and who couldn’t like that?20191015_144105-2-copy-1.jpg20191015_150527 2 copy.jpeg20191015_150725_001 copy.jpg20191015_154154 copy.jpg20191015_160811 copy.jpg20191015_104409 2.jpg20191015_143953.jpegA really, really really successful day…..well done to Paulton Park!

Reading matters……

91OwoXUQWwL copy.jpgBeing held up with the sale of our house prior to moving to Cheshire (or Lancashire, not absolutely definite yet……), I have had to make do with reading about the county. I was glad to see on a recent visit to Waterstones that a new guide was out in the ‘Slow Travel’ series by Bradt. This I have devoured from cover to cover. It really is a most unusual and brilliant series of guides. Written by local experts, ‘Cheshire’ was a revelation. So many out of the way places, restaurants, farm shops, attractions of all kinds that we haven’t yet visited in our trips up North. And what you quickly learn in this guide is that your probable preconceptions about the county – flat, inland, dairy farms, cheese, the houses of footballers and Coronation Street stars – is wide of the mark in many respects. Parts of the countryside are as beautiful as anywhere, there are some lovely heights to walk along and get amazing views, Cheshire has a coast (the Wirrall) which is well worth a visit. And history and industrial interest are everywhere. And undoubtedly Chester itself is one of my absolute top-favourites of small towns, more spectacular than York in both setting and what it contains. Thanks to ‘Cheshire’ I am more anxious than ever to migrate there!71auesail3l-copy.jpg

Before our recent trip to Verona, I sent for the book ‘Italian Neighbours : An Englishman in Verona’ by Tim Parks. It seemed a natural for anyone visiting this most splendid of cities. But the more I got into the book, the more and more disappointed and frustrated I became, because this wasn’t about Verona at all but about the little village somewhere near Verona where Parks lives. Verona got about two mentions. Whilst it was moderately interesting in itself, it really was something that should have fallen foul of the Trades Descriptions Act. Caveat Emptor!91myUPhS1GL copy.jpg                                                                                                         Having fallen completely in love with Venice again ( we were only there for a few hours), we have both been re-reading the Commisario Brunetti novels by Donna Leon. ‘Death At La Fenice’ is the very first, and I have just finished it. It certainly doesn’t read like a first novel (as so many first novels do), and all of the characteristics which are in the many later novels are also present here. The emphasis on Brunetti’s home life, the pointing up of differences between how men think and how women think, the drinks and the meals, the description of place, the realistic conveying of how Venice ‘feels’, the ever=present undercurrents of Italian politics and corruption – all are just as important as the plots which are never very convoluted and therefore ideal bedtime reading. So glad we went to Venice to get us back into reading these brilliant evocations of Italian life!!!

Heritage Open Day in Liskeard….September

 

20190914_105822.jpegWe only discovered the Heritage Open Day was happening in Liskeard for two days by chance on the internet. We missed the first day. After parking the car on our walk into town we came to the first of the buildings we visited – a private house called Tregantle. What an eye opener this was. We had passed it many times, without a thought really, other than that it was quite a nice frontage. Stepping inside the owner had taken the trouble to do a tremendous amount of research about its history and its design by the famous Liskeard architect Henry Rice.                                                                                                                        Henry Rice started out as a land surveyor and architect who went on to transform Liskeard. He had a strong social conscience and made frequent sanitary inspections of the densely populated and poverty-stricken courts where the poor lived. His findings were recorded in his ‘Nuisance’ notebooks, which make fascinating, if sometimes gruesome, reading. As a result the corporation made him Inspector of Nuisances. He also brought piped water and sewers to the town.
Born in Kenwyn parish, Rice was a farmer’s son and staunch Methodist who lived the whole of his adult life in Liskeard. Over 100 of his buildings, mostly in the Classical style, survive, including a large number of terraces built along the roads into the town.

20190914_103748.jpgThis is the front room as is. The owner had bought the house  with all the ‘improvements’ you would expect from the early 70’s – artex ceilings, ripped out fireplaces, everywhere painted magnolia etc etc. Over a period of time, and particularly when she had retired from teaching, she gradually transformed the house reinstalling original Victorian fireplaces and reinstating appropriate colour schemes and trying to preserve every detail from the original designs. A true labour of love. I didn’t like to take photos as we were really guests in her house…..20190914_103844.jpgbut this is one of the two staircases….20190914_104543.jpgand this picture shows industrial use right outside the rear of the property. And this is still in use as a glass making premises……The Glassworks address is actually Pavlova Mill. The mill dates back to the 19th century where it was used as a tannery making gloves. There is very little history on Pavlova Mill but it is said to have been named after the Russian Ballerina, Anna Pavlova, one of the finest classical ballet dancers in history! The tannery is said to have made gloves exclusively for the dancer, whether or not this is true, the mill has taken her name. Interesting!20190914_104254.jpgNext stop was the Weslyan Methodist Church which we had often admired from outside. The original chapel burnt down and was financed and rebuilt largely as now within a two year period. They didn’t mess about did they the Victorians? Inside a volunteer showed us around and pointed out the original and rough wooden stool used by John Wesley when he preached in Cornwall.Methodist-Church.jpg The building was designed for 300 worshippers….20190914_110316.jpgand the plaster ceiling is impressive. Henry Rice designed an extension a little later.20190914_110430.jpgAnd the church became a very prominent organisation within Liskeard. Upstairs to one side this enormous hall was used for teaching. Indeed in the Second World War teaching still took place in the church’s cellars! Average congregation these days is about 30.20190914_111335.jpgOn our way past Stuart House a late medieval house where King Charles stayed in the Civil War. F. showed me the garden which I hadn’t’t seen before, but which is very inviting for tea and cake.20190914_113426.jpgThe Mayor’s Parlour  and Civic Chamber were supposed to be open, but weren’t…….20190914_114023.jpgSo off we went to St Martin’s Church unvisited before. It includes some Norman fragments, but is mostly 15th century. The South Chapel dates from 1428, the south chancel aisle from 1430, and additions to the north side from 1477. The tower was repaired in 1675, but was largely rebuilt between 1898 and 1902 at a cost of £6,400 (equivalent to £682,500 in 2018) by John Sampson of Liskeard. And the main point in coming today was to climb the tower.20190914_115430.jpgFirst we both had a go at bell ringing – unsuccessfully. It is much harder to get the knack than I thought.20190914_115458.jpegThen whilst F. had a coffee I climbed the tower. First we went to the bell ringers’ domain where they entertained us to a number of peals. Very interesting.20190914_121354.jpgThen, having been issued with ear plugs, we went up to the bell chamber, whilst the performance continued. Hands over ears were necessary as well as plugs!20190914_122827.jpgPartially deaf now, we ascended more steps to the top where we had the great privilege of seeing Liskeard and its surrounds from a viewpoint normally out of bounds……the day was fine and picture taking conditions good….20190914_123106.jpg20190914_123111.jpg20190914_123134.jpegIt was good to see the uniform nature of the roofs nearly all with Delabole slates. This common pattern of roofing does add immeasurably to the character of any historic town. 20190914_123147.jpg20190914_123248.jpeg20190914_123317.jpeg20190914_123402.jpgTime for one more photo out of one of the niche windows on the way down….20190914_123945.jpegWalking around the outside of the church we saw it from angles unfamiliar to us…..20190914_124715.jpg20190914_124951.jpg………and descended into town past some very nice rows of cottages. A very instructive two or three hours which made us much more appreciative of the buildings and community of Liskeard.20190914_125213.jpg

 

A trip to the opera in Verona – Part 4

20190905_152555.jpg……. all of a sudden here was ‘the bridge with no parapet’. Worth seeing, but a minute later there were about ten people on there having their photos taken…….20190905_152519.jpgLooking at our map we saw we were fairly near the Rialto Bridge and so we headed there with the thought of using our vaporetto tickets some more. 20190905_153824.jpgAfter a quick think we caught a vaporetto going to Murano island, famous of course for its glass…..20190905_154738.jpgWe went under the Rialto….20190905_154551.jpgand were soon on our way up the Grand Canal again….20190905_155444.jpg20190905_155618.jpg20190905_155746.jpg20190905_160401.jpga lovely relaxing ride over the lagoon, and we were there.20190905_164237.jpg20190905_164406.jpgWhat a contrast to Venice. No hoards of people. No clicking cameras. Just a smattering of ordinary people who actually live here. Yes there were a number of glass shops and I am sure Murano does get busy. But not when we were there, thank goodness.20190905_164815.jpg20190905_165650.jpg20190905_165654.jpegThe church’s plain facade and stark isolated bell tower belied the face it presented to the canal…..20190905_170008.jpgand there were some lovely features inside, including the floors…20190905_165110.jpg…and naturally some glass work……20190905_165506.jpgthere were even ordinary shops…..20190905_170706.jpgand rows of ‘ordinary’ houses….20190905_170756.jpgFeeling thirsty just before we were to catch our return boat, and unable to find a local bar or cafe, we popped into a boutique hotel which had just recently opened…. we were on our own.20190905_172614.jpeg20190905_172653.jpgIt was really very pleasant, and the view………20190905_175229.jpgWe returned a slightly different way across the lagoon and this took us past the cemetery on San Michele island… in fact the whole island is only occupied by churches and by long ranks of tombs. Fascinating.20190905_182114.jpg20190905_184647.jpg20190905_184925.jpgWe disembarked at the station where we were a little early, but the evening light was fantastic….20190905_190451.jpg20190905_191150.jpgand rather than join the policeman and his girlfriend at the station bar, we took our drinks outside with a bag of crisps and sat on the steps…..20190905_194203.jpeguntil the turning on of the lights notified us of our train….20190905_194947.jpegBack in Verona, the evening mood walking through the streets for home was delightful….20190906_195353.jpgand in Verona as in Milan we were always seeing stylish new shops……here a quirky display from an optician. For some reason F. told me Verona is famous for its opticians and eye-testing……..20190906_200655.jpgThe next day, our last, we were due to catch a bus to Lake Garda a short distance away, but we were awakened to an enormous storm (lots and lots of thunder and lightning). It lasted all day and led to us staying in and playing a new and enjoyable game, given to us by our daughter, lots and lots of times (Bananagrams). The weather abated for the evening and we had a last stroll around Verona, calling at a locals bar for a last drink or two….20190906_201504.jpg20190906_203211.jpgOn the day of our leaving we popped around the corner to the cake shop we had only just discovered for breakfast, again with lots of locals who nearly always stand….20190907_093227.jpg20190907_093956.jpgand after a last shop at the grocers for a bottle of Limoncello and some olive oil..we made our way to the bus stop by the river, passing a very busy artists school…20190907_111000.jpg20190907_111115.jpgto arrive eventually in plenty of time at the airport – this time Bergamo – which as you can see is quite scenic itself. What a magnificent trip.20190907_150327.jpg

A trip to the opera in Verona – Part 3

20190905_092307 copy.jpegAfter a quick cup of coffee next morning we caught the bus to the station and then the Italo train to Venice (all booked at home on Trainline). I still can’t get over the amazing sight that greets you on coming out of the station concourse. You are immediately in the heart of Venice and its canals. Right there. At the start of the Grand Canal. It’s like stepping onto a film set. Incredible.20190905_110519 copy.jpegWe knew that the water taxis – the famous vaporetti – would be nearby. They were right outside.20190905_112445 copy.jpegWe grabbed a day ticket each (12 Euros) and what a bargain that proved to be. It was worth it for the trip into the centre alone. The boat went more or less the whole length of the Grand Canal stopping along the way. What a journey. Click after click went my mobile.20190905_114010 copy.jpeg20190905_114103 copy.jpegAnd what I couldn’t get over was how busy the waterways were. Particularly with goods traffic. Everything from dredgers with their miasmatic loads to DHL boats (imagine) to fruit and veg boats. I really hadn’t appreciated that this was how it would be.20190905_114402 copy.jpg20190905_114509 copy.jpgI understand that gondoliers get around £95,000 a year……..but they still can’t afford to live in Venice itself…….20190905_114723.jpeg

20190905_115715.jpgBut the architecture was something else. We all know the problems of Venice – the stupidly large cruise ships, the conversion of old buildings to hotels, flats, Airbnb, the loss of residents to tourism. According to Bloomberg ‘The city’s population basically peaked in the 1500s, and though it rallied again to near 16th century levels in the 1970s, today there are just one third as many Venetians as 50 years ago.’ Less than 50,000 residents compared to over 20 million visitors each year, of which over half are day trippers (just like us). It’s all a disaster. Basically the place is a museum. But what a museum! 20190905_120128.jpg20190905_120307.jpgAll too soon our journey was over and we disembarked at the Piazza San Marco. 20190905_121030.jpeg20190905_121510.jpgBecause we were here for such a short time we had no intention of actually going inside places (just as in Milan). That would have been pointless to try. Instead we wanted to ‘feel’ Venice. So, we enjoyed the sheer size and splendour of the Doge’s Palace…..20190905_121606.jpgthe Piazza itself (Napoleon called it the drawing room of Europe)……20190905_121825.jpgand of course the Basilica….20190905_122010.jpg20190905_121811.jpgas well as the Renaissance-style clock tower20190905_121920.jpgHowever fairly quickly and decisively we headed off down the nearest street in order to escape the tourists….(sorry, I should say the other tourists)….20190905_122200.jpegThat escape never came. We walked 30,000 steps that day, (according to my app about 12 miles, but say 8 or 9 miles), and we never got rid of other tourists. They were literally everywhere. And not only tourists, but tourists’ shops. Like Blackpool in the 50’s. Well not quite.20190905_123442.jpgBut you could have 200 million visitors a year let alone 20 million, and you still wouldn’t take away the beauty, the specialness of the city…..around every corner, and I do mean every corner, a wonderful view……20190905_123623.jpg20190905_125320.jpgWe were heading for the district of Castello to visit a special bookshop. But we just headed in a general direction, not concerned whether we got lost…..which we did frequently…20190905_125532.jpeg20190905_125536.jpg20190905_130023.jpgand eventually we were there……the Libreria Acqua Alta. In this unique shop, which has been called one of the most beautiful in the world, and is certainly one if not the quirkiest, books are stored and on display in gondolas, canoes, and bathtubs. Books are even turned into furniture and architecture themselves! Books that got ruined by high water, or acqua alta have not been thrown away, but have been used instead to become decorative features, walls or even the steps of a book staircase that gives wonderful views over the canal. It is unbelievable. Especially to a couple of people like ourselves who owned two very nice bookshops. The guy who owns this has turned a problem into an opportunity in a very big way indeed.20190905_131205.jpg20190905_131221.jpgWe sat fascinated by the loop of film which shows the shop actually under water……20190905_131358.jpg20190905_131409_003.jpeg20190905_131747.jpgand as for the full-size gondola in the middle of the shop……Incroyable!ve-lib.jpg20190905_132437.jpgUnless we had seen it we wouldn’t have believed it, but lunch called…..and we resumed our magical footsteps20190905_133120.jpg20190905_150500.jpgand we were so lucky to find what on this day was probably the quietest piazza in the whole of Venice…….we had yet another ‘special’ birthday lunch here at Osteria Boccadero (I was doing so well with this birthday….). 20190905_140630.jpg20190905_140636.jpegIt was really really nice. And my squid ink seafood linguini was delicious…….20190905_141505.jpgSuitably rested and refreshed we only had one more ‘objective’ (good to have objectives) on this day, and that was to see the ‘bridge with no parapet’. This involved a walk along the lagoon side of Venice along a lovely promenade, then cutting back towards the Grand Canal…..20190905_150950.jpg

A trip to the opera in Verona – Part 2

20190903_161708 copy.jpgNext stop was the Roman amphitheatre, not to be confused with the Arena where we would be seeing the opera..built around the end of the first century B.C. its visible remains today include the stage, the orchestra, the auditorium and some galleries on two subsequent levels together with a top corridor.It was being set up for a pop concert on our visit….
20190903_172945 copy.jpgbut the Roman seating was still clearly visible,20190903_162128 copy.jpgand the setting marvellous….20190903_162523 copy.jpeg20190903_162558 copy.jpg20190903_162741 copy.jpg20190903_163009 copy.jpgAlso on site there is a fascinating museum with Roman finds from Verona in an old fourteenth century monastery behind the theatre………….here a floor…20190903_163621 copy.jpeg                           a wall decoration….20190903_163851 copy.jpeg……a funerary Stella which translates “Cippus lays a curse on anyone who dares to dirty or violate  the sepulchre”. Obviously this must have been an issue in Verona!20190903_163913 copy.jpg…..lots of pottery and glassware….absolutely incredible it survives….20190903_164704 copy 2.jpeg20190903_164711 copy.jpg…..a larger than life-size bronze foot from a statue….20190903_165642 copy.jpgand an upper walk…….Verona full then of layers of History which is all wonderful to see……..20190903_172146 copy.jpgNext day we again walked into town passing one of the ubiquitous policemen. wherever we went there were police of varying sorts some with sub machine-guns , all with holstered pistols……..all very different from England.20190904_101130 copy.jpegOur first destination was the Arena itself…of the outside only the Ala, a short section of the outer ring that was the façade of the Arena, has been preserved, shown here in my photo. Under the reign of Theodoric (493-526 AD), the outer ring was partially demolished for the construction of a second set of defensive walls, and until the Renaissance the Arena was used as a stone quarry. The façade features just one architectural style, the Tuscan order, with bossages and limestone blocks from Valpolicella.20190904_114138 copy.jpegOnce inside the scale of the building became clear…..this was after all the third largest arena in Italy…..20190904_112347 copy.jpeg20190904_112501 copy.jpg20190904_112825 copy.jpgExcavations under the structure have brought to light a complex hydraulic system which enabled water to be brought inside the amphitheatre, both for spectacular water games and to clean up the arena after the bloody fights held there. All quite incredible to behold.20190904_113541 copy.jpgOn our way to our next point of interest we popped into one of the many churches. This was St Niccolo, a fine example of Italian seventeenth century architecture…..20190904_114659 copy.jpegWe also explored the church of Sant’Anastasia.20190904_141857-copy.jpegI loved the flooring in particular, all local marble…..20190904_142508-copy.jpegThe hunchbacks of Verona are two figures in the church, which are supporting the two stoups at the base of the first columns of the church’s central nave.20190904_142523_001.jpg20190904_143018-copy.jpg20190904_143710-copy.jpg20190904_143740-copy.jpgNext on our itinerary however was the Torre Dei Lamberti Tower – located in the Piazza della Erbe, the Torre Dei Lamberti is the tallest of several towers in Verona. In 12th century Verona, as was the practice in many Italian cities at the time, noble families demonstrated their power and wealth through constructing tall and elaborate towers. The towers acted as luxurious homes as well as watch towers. Ideally, towers were built to be bigger than the nearest tower. Writing this has brought back memories of San Gimignano where there are many such towers giving it the name ‘The Town of Fine Towers’.

Anyhow as the name suggests, the Lamberti Tower was built by the wealthy Lamberti family. Work was begun on the tower in 1172 and was eventually completed in 1463. Over the years however, modifications have been made including the raising of the height by the Venetians in the 16th century. It is still possible to make out the different sections of the tower based on the building materials used.

20190904_115438 copy.jpgBefore ascending the tower we visited what was called an exhibition of Veronese modern art. I must say it didn’t seem very modern to either of us, but that just shows everywhere is different.20190904_115946 copy.jpegWhat I did like very much was the sensuous painting by Hayez (the Italian equivalent to DeLaCroix) of the personification of “Italy”. She holds the cross in one hand and the volume entitled “History of Italy” in the other, in memory of the martyrdom that took place in the streets of Milan in the days of 1848, when attempts were made unsuccessfully to obtain  independence from the Hapsburg Empire and work towards the unification of Italy…..she is therefore both strong yet vulnerable. 20190904_120335 copy.jpegand these sculptures I admired which were about six or nine inches tall…..20190904_121052 copy.jpegWe then exited into the courtyard where the striping effect of use of brick interlaid with marble was quite clear………..20190904_121306 copy.jpgand we ascended the tower not slowly by its 368 steps but quickly on the elevator! The views were worth our admittedly slender effort…..20190904_122252 copy.jpeg20190904_122350 copy.jpgWhat is absolutely clear looking at these photos is the significance in historic towns of roofing all done in the same local materials….this gives such a sense of unity.20190904_122748 copy.jpegWe came out into the Piazza Della Erbe  for a quick look at the pensive statue of Dante…..it represents another manifestation of the struggle for independence…20190904_123131 copy.jpg20190904_123317 copy.jpeg20190904_123328 copy.jpg………………we just had a fleeting visit then to the Scaliger Tombs – a group of five Gothic funerary monuments in Verona, celebrating the Scaliger family, who ruled in Verona from the 13th to the late 14th century.The tombs are located in a court of the church of Santa Maria Antica, separated from the street by a wall with medieval iron grilles. Built in Gothic style, they are a series of tombs, most of which are in the shape of a small temple and covered by a baldachin. According to the French historian Georges Duby, they are one of the most outstanding examples of Gothic art. The  wrought iron enclosure is decorated with a stair motif, in reference to the Italian meaning of the name of the family, della Scala………..20190904_123900 copy.jpg20190904_124204 copy.jpgLunch beckoned and whilst the restaurants in the Piazza looked lovely……… 20190904_124639 copy.jpgwe found, down a side street, what turned out to be a fantastic local restaurant for my birthday lunch…..20190904_130206 copy.jpg20190904_131042 copy.jpegProsecco, Soave, brilliant food and a relaxing coffee…what more could one ask?20190904_135126 copy.jpgOn our way to the Duomo…20190904_140931 copy.jpegwe saw yet another elevated tomb….it seems the Veronesi are trying to get as close to Heaven as they dare.20190904_141501 copy.jpeg20190904_144632-copy.jpg20190904_144719-copy.jpg20190904_145118-copy.jpgThe Cathedral, which is dedicated to Santa Maria Assunta, is the central structure of a complex of architectural buildings which include San Giovanni in Fonte, Santa Elena, the Canons’ cloister, the Capitular library, the square in front of the church and the bishop’s residence. During the Roman Empire, in the area of the present day church, there were villas with private thermal baths (balnea) and probably also a few small temples. duomo800.jpgThe first palaeo Christian basilica was built on the area occupied today by the church of Santa Elena. It was consecrated by S. Zeno, bishop of Verona, between 362 380 A.D. but it soon turned out to be too small and a few decades later it was replaced by a larger basilica. Quite a few remains of the mosaic floor of both palaeo Christian basilicas can be seen under the church of Santa Elena and the Canons’ cloister.

The second palaeo christian basilica collapsed, probably during the 7th century A.D., due to a strong fire or maybe an earthquake. Archdeacon Pacifico was in charge of the reconstruction of the church, between the 8th and the 9th century and the Cathedral, known by the name of Santa Maria Matricolare, was built further south, on the area on which it is situated today.

The church was greatly damaged by an earthquake in 1117 A.D. and reconstruction work lasted at least 20 years: the building acquired its current width and the two Romanesque porches.
The inside was completely renovated between the second half of the 15th and the second half of the 16th century with the addition of the side chapels and the semicircular choir screen.The floor is magnificent and composed of local marbles….20190904_145841 copy.jpg20190904_150014 copy.jpg20190904_150124 copy.jpeg20190904_151339 copy.jpg20190904_151544 copy.jpegAt one point I was amazed to find on a shelf some modern scriptural texts bound exquisitely which I examined……works of art in their own right…..20190904_151929 copy.jpegBack home over the bridge of stone to get ready for the opera….20190904_154423 copy.jpegEven arriving at the opera was special…..we were due to see Carmen.20190904_201846 copy.jpgand once inside it was obvious how spectacular the occasion was going to be….20190904_203049 copy.jpg20190904_203055 copy.jpg20190904_215633 copy.jpgThe performance was outstanding with two of the three main singers very strong. The orchestra was on top form and the production itself was all you would expect in so magnificent an arena. As a birthday present – sensational!20190904_235150 copy.jpegCarmen_FotoEnnevi_220618_0020_20180622-blocco-show-2018-1.jpgThe walk home through Verona at night was delightful…….20190905_001732 copy.jpg20190905_001904 copy.jpg

A trip to the opera in Verona – Part 1

20190901_154650 copy.jpegFor my 70th Birthday I was treated to a trip to Verona to see the opera in the Roman arena ( a lifetime’s ambition). The flight from Bristol was great with unusually clear views over England and France and Italy. Landing at Milan Malpensa airport, we then caught the train to Milan. The station at Milan was incredibly large, imposing and typical of Fascist Brutalist architecture. I have since found out it is in fact the largest station  in Europe.20190902_102834 copy.jpegIt’s always nice to get your first cup of coffee and pastry when in Italy…here in one of the many station cafes…20190902_101952 copy.jpgGetting to our hotel/apartment Residenza delle Città we found it to be immediately full of Italian style….20190901_204250 copy.jpgRDC_Social_Lobby_04.f8f13c6ddc1a9cbab724bb6abd5ef197.jpgand the apartment itself was terrific.tzoo.hd.85800.3586.450427.ResidenzaDelleCitta.jpgI had done a lot of research on where to eat. However, around the corner we ignored all that research and found a lovely pizza place that looked like a regular neighbourhood hang-out rather than any chain pizza restaurant. And so it proved. Not a single tourist in there, English or otherwise. It was just what we wanted. One of the two brothers who own it looked after us and a good time was had by all. The pizzas were fantastic.20190901_221226 copy.jpeg20190901_213340 copy.jpgNext day we went first of course to the Duomo famously the largest church in Italy. Knowing we had only a few hours in Milan we made no attempt to go inside, but we looked at it from every angle, and enjoyed the sumptuous carving….20190902_114026 copy.jpeg20190902_112040 copy.jpegin stone……20190902_113415 copy.jpegand bronze….interestingly the doors are nineteenth and twentieth century not the work of medieval craftsmen as I first thought.20190902_113633 copy.jpegThere was much to admire.20190902_113554 copy.jpgAfter a quick walk around Piazza del Duomo…20190902_111919-copy.jpg20190902_110910 copy.jpegwe passed up one of the streets full of stylish shops….20190902_123656.jpg……..here a bookshop ( which we can never resist of course)….20190902_111715 copy.jpgto come quickly to la Galleria Vittorio Emanuele  which was second on our list of must-sees, and an absolutely stunning example of a posh shopping arcade, full of Versace, Prada and other famous Italian and international designers.20190902_111513 copy.jpeg111247580-milan-italy-april-13-inside-shopping-mall-galleria-vittorio-emanueke-ii-on-april-13-2-018-in-milan.jpg20190902_103429 copy.jpgBut all the shops in downtown Milan are sensational, not just in the arcade. How about this for an alternative to the Aga?20190902_105524 copy.jpgOur stroll through the city revealed a superb range of classy buildings….20190902_104957.jpeg and even gateways to splendid private houses…20190902_100455-copy.jpegWe lunched in the Piazza Del Duomo….20190902_125005.jpghaving passed on the stairwell what looked like a very old olive tree but was in fact a bronze sculpture……..a- ma-zing….20190902_124313.jpgWe then wound our way slowly down cobbled streets with a mix of old and new trams (very reminiscent of Lisbon)…..20190902_110215 copy.jpgto a favourite Milanese public garden – the Parco Sempione – a large placid green area, nice after the bustle of town,  running from the Castello Sforzesco to Arco della Pace. After our peaceful interlude in the park…..20190902_121107.jpgwe had a good look around the castle, the core of it dating back to 1358-1368  during the Visconti’s period who used the Castle as his residence while he stayed in Milan, but mostly used it as a military base. Later, it was mainly Francesco Sforza who, as ruler of Milan in 1450, gave particular impetus to the reconstruction of the building  which had been seriously damaged between 1447 and 1450. He quickly rebuilt the castle, this time with a 230 ft tall central tower – the Torre del Filarete (now a symbol of Milan itself), flanked with large round towers. His successors further improved and embellished the castle. 20190902_120611.jpg20190902_120307.jpg20190902_120138.jpg20190902_115811.jpgThe inside of the castle is now home to several museums which we noted as worth our attention on a longer visit (let’s hope it’s soon!). 20190902_120324.jpegWe had covered a lot of ground and after another quick coffee made our way to our train, and here a word about the Italo trains. We went on two during our time in Italy, and I think we were in ‘Smart’ class both times, the lowest of four classes. To us it smacked of style and comfort with leather seats, foot rests, individual waste containers etc etc. If only Italo would take over our national railways!stazione-termini-italo-2.jpg20190902_170129.jpgThe area between Milan and Verona is famous for a number of significant wines including Prosecco, Valpolicello and more….so, vineyard after vineyard was glimpsed from the train windows…..20190902_174628.jpgalso the odd lake, and always the mountains in the background – the Apennines, the backbone of Italy, 870 miles long and surging up to 9000 feet at their highest…20190902_173743.jpegThe railway infrastructure was quite impressive too…here a signal box…what was most impressive however was the smoothness and speed of the journey – at one point we were doing 247k an hour (153mph). Fantastic.20190902_163829.jpegOur flat in Verona was booked through Airbnb and was very pleasant. But its big plus was that it was outside the tourist centre and in a residential district. So the people we bumped into were Italian. Whilst this meant a reasonable walk to get into the centre, it was absolutely fine. We were in no hurry anyway.20190902_191915 copy.jpeg20190902_191942 copy.jpegOn our first night we wandered over the Porta Nuovo into town, and relaxed with an outdoor meal at one of the hundreds of cafes and restaurants…20190902_203108 copy.jpegF. had the most boring salad ever, my spicy aubergine bake was very tasty. The bottle of local wine went down a treat..20190902_205649 copy.jpgAlong the street of our restaurant were some excavations revealing what? I never did find out!20190902_215756 copy.jpgThe atmosphere at night in Verona is great….it’s a pleasure to walk around.20190902_215838 copy.jpgand lively……20190902_220420 copy.jpg20190902_220426 copy.jpg20190902_220717 copy.jpegThe next morning – our first – we ambled along our narrow little street to the river…20190903_100358 copy.jpgThis is the river Adige, second longest in Italy, rising in Switzerland…..and there are beautiful walks and promenades along it….20190903_113506.jpeg20190903_113523 copy.jpgAs this is Italy there are quite a lot of bikes…..20190903_114354 copy.jpgafter walking into town we reached what is regarded as the centre of Verona – Piazza Bra, huge and full of restaurants, cafes, bars, shops……..20190903_115318-copy.jpegand of course the Roman amphitheatre  built in the first century, and where we were due to go to the Opera the next day. In fact it is internationally famous for the large-scale opera performances given there and is one of the best preserved ancient structures of its kind. In ancient times, the arena’s capacity was nearly 30,000 people. The stage for concerts and opera performances decreases the available places to a maximum nowadays of 15,000. It will be used as the closing ceremony for the 2026 Winter Olympics in Milan and Cortina d’Ampezzo. (Must watch if we’re still around!). 20190903_115112 copy.jpgLuckily, as the weather was hot, there is a beautiful little garden in the midst of Piazza Bra which we availed ourselves of to consult our map.20190903_120408 copy.jpegHaving bought a Verona card which was 25 Euros each for two days ( a bargain as it turned out ), and which allows entry to all sorts of places as well as bus travel etc, we then made our way through one of the ancient arches, this one fifteenth century……20190903_123127 copy.jpegand along some nice arcades……20190903_123252_004 copy.jpegto the Castelvecchio fortress which took the name “Castelvecchio” (meaning “old castle” of course in Italian) just after the construction of the Castel San Pietro in 1393, which is located nearby.
The castle, an imposing complex marked by seven brick towers, was completed in 1356 as a defensive structure aimed to control the access to the city from the river Adige and it was converted into a museum or in fact a series of museums in the 1920s.
From 1958 to 1964, the museum was completely renovated and updated after a design by famous Italian architect Carlo Scarpa. Scarpa’s project, which harmoniously combined contemporary building materials, such as bare concrete and steel, with the castle’s medieval architecture, is still widely considered among the best examples of the conversion of a historic building into a modern museum.20190903_125242 copy.jpg20190903_125454 copy.jpegThe building is a large square compound made mainly out of red bricks and is an impressive example of Gothic architecture. One of the most noteworthy features of the castle is its imposing M-shaped merlons which run along the walls of the bridge and the castle itself. There are seven towers in the castle along with a maschio or a super elevated keep. Inside are four main buildings. Castelvecchio is surrounded by a ditch that is now dry. When the castle was first built, the moat was filled with water from the nearby Adige. 20190903_125647 copy.jpg“It is believed that the castle was built on the location of an earlier Roman fortress. The castle and nearby bridge were built by Lord Cangrande II della Scala, who in 1350 married Elizabeth, the daughter of Louis IV of Bavaria and the Countess of Hainualt, Margaret II. The castle was constructed as a deterrent to attack by powerful neighbors like the Sforzas and Gonzagas and the city state of Venice.                                                        The construction of the castle started in 1354 and Cangrande died in 1359, before it was completed. The fortified bridge over the Adige was designed to let the castle’s inhabitants escape north to Tyrol in case of a rebellion or a coup d’etat.                                                 During the time of Venetian rule in the area slits were added to the structure to allow defence by cannons. The fortress was badly damaged during the Napoleonic Wars and Napoleon himself stayed in the castle many times when he visited Verona. Under the later rule of the Austrians the castle was used as barracks and was later restored in 1923.”20190903_131029-copy.jpgThe art galleries and museums were full of surprises and well worth an extended visit…20190903_130423 copy.jpgOne thing that particularly caught our eye on the walls were these artists’ preparatory drawings and underpainting – absolutely fascinating – and fourteenth century.20190903_131552 copy.jpg20190903_131556 copy.jpgand this – almost like a cartoon book – thirty Bible stories painted on wood, again fourteenth century.20190903_131754 copy.jpegThese pics give some idea of the sumptuousness of medieval wall decoration….pretty spectacular you have to agree.20190903_131945_007 copy.jpeg20190903_133153 copy.jpg20190903_133340 copy.jpegAnd here a view of the Skaliger or Castelvecchio Bridge – a fortified bridge that was built over the River Adige. The bridge featured segmental arches and when it was originally constructed it had the world’s largest span at 48.7 meters.The bridge was built as we noted around 1354 by Lord Cangrande II in order to facilitate escape from his fortress. A reflection of the times! The construction was solid and the bridge remained intact until the end of the 18th century when French troops destroyed the left bank tower. In 1945, during World War II, the bridge along with Ponte Pietra was totally destroyed by the Germans. Reconstruction began in 1949 and was completed two years later on all but the left tower. The bridge was built using red bricks for the upper part, quite common with the landmarks in the city during the Scaliger era. The lower portion of the bridge was fashioned out of white marble. Legend has it that the designer of the bridge, Guglielmo Bevilacqua arrived at the inauguration ceremony riding a horse, ready to flee in case it came crumbling down. When the bridge was seen to be a success Bevilacqua was reportedly presented with a sword belonging to Saint Martin by Cangrande.20190903_133710 copy.jpgOne of the highlights of our visit was the walk around the walls and battlements…..20190903_133832 copy.jpg20190903_133914 copy.jpgand I thought a very unusual and perhaps typically Italian stylish touch was to find a little garden perched on the battlements themselves. Terrific.20190903_134304 copy.jpg20190903_134315 copy.jpgAt the end of the high-level walk we came across a statue of Cangrande II Della Scala himself, immortalised in stone like the archetypal cavalier. Scarpa the architect decided to place this particular sculpture on a concrete plinth seven metres high, creating an  niche that allowed the work to be seen from multiple angles…….20190903_133951-copy.jpgOur little tour finished, just beside our bus stop was The Arco dei Gavi  an ancient structure built by the gens Gavia, a noble Roman family who had their hometown in Verona, at the beginning of the Via Postumia, the Roman road leading into the city. During the Middle Ages it was used as a gate in the walls.20190903_135524_001 copy.jpegOur free bus was very pleasant and free of tourists….20190903_141618 copy.jpgWe got off in an area where we quickly disposed of a double ice cream each and headed past a group of rather nice buildings….20190903_142117 copy.jpg20190903_142212 copy.jpgand along a promenade…..20190903_142217 copy.jpg20190903_142658 copy.jpgto the funicular which we took up to the viewpoint…910A4130_1-1030x687.jpgwhere we stayed a while enjoying the amazing vistas……20190903_145141 copy.jpeg20190903_145500 copy.jpeg20190903_145721 copy.jpegIt had all been thirsty work, so we stopped off at a hilltop cafe again with the incredible views and sank a large beer and orange juice…..20190903_154824 copy.jpg

Visit of David and Jennifer……August 2019

20190824_155954 copy.jpegVisitors gives us the chance to do something different. When you have been in a place  three years, you tend to the obvious. The always welcome appearance of David and Jennifer took us first ten-pin bowling. None of us the best but enjoyed by all.20190824_161640 copy.jpeg20190824_161724 copy.jpegOn another day we went to Falmouth. First a splendid birthday lunch at The Royal Duchy Hotel where we were then able to leave our car for the afternoon’s trip. Then into town.the-royal-duchy-hotel-01.jpgAlways a great place to visit, apart from its seaside connotations Falmouth has some nice streets…20190825_145441 copy.jpgand some brilliant houses and buildings – often the historic homes of sea captains.20190825_145451 copy.jpg20190825_145929 copy.jpeg20190825_150042 copy.jpeg20190825_151150 copy.jpeg20190825_151248 copy.jpeg20190825_182327 copy.jpgBeing a Bank Holiday, the shopping streets and harbour were full of people and atmosphere.20190825_150554-copy.jpegWe however had decided to take the ferry across to St Mawes which is always a really enjoyable trip with plenty to see…..20190825_154746 copy.jpg20190825_155351 copy.jpg20190825_160011 copy.jpg at both ends…..20190825_160138-copy.jpegAfter a little paddle…….20190825_161757-copy.jpg……….it was good to see David and Jennifer were still enjoying themselves. We then walked along the ‘promenade’ through town to the castle.20190825_162402 copy.jpgOn the way this time I noticed a very quirky little gunnel or alleyway (don’t know what they call them in these parts……where we used to live in York it was ‘snickleways’}. Anyhow very picturesque.20190825_162741 copy.jpeg        Not a single house in St Mawes I wouldn’t give my right arm for……20190825_163615 copy.jpegThe castle, looking across to its sister in Falmouth, was impressive as always….20190825_164211 copy.jpeg20190825_164240 copy.jpegBut we decided it was all thirsty work and called to Olga Polizzi’s Hotel Tresanton  for an ice cream and cup of Earl Grey….very nice.member_b_122.jpg

But 20190825_172600 copy.jpg20190825_170309 copy.jpgAll in all a lovely two or three days. And when they had disappeared back to London it was still Bank Holiday and one of those days when, in going to Looe to collect our daily paper, we found the sea busy as well as the beach…there are’nt many days like that!20190826_131644 copy.jpegWe also enjoyed the Lambretta parade through town…….maybe 50 or 60 of them.20190826_132454 copy.jpg