Reading Matters……

61e4zqgxqkl._sx324_bo1204203200_.jpgIn 1346, at the age of sixteen, he won his spurs at Crecy; nine years later he conducted a brutal raid across Languedoc; in 1356 he captured the king of France at Poitiers; as lord of Aquitaine he ruled a vast swathe of southwestern France. He was Edward of Woodstock, eldest son of Edward III, but better known to posterity as ‘the Black Prince.The Prince learned the graft of warfare the hard way. At the famous English victory at Crécy in 1346, the 16-year-old Edward was placed in notional command of the vanguard. When he became severely pressed by a French onslaught (the English were outnumbered by almost two to one), his father is reported to have delayed sending his son any reinforcements, saying: ‘Let the boy win his spurs.’ And so the boy did, with a characteristic display of the courage and steadfastness that so impressed his contemporaries. Here and throughout, Jones captures the drama and press of a medieval battle. I normally shy away from the second tier of historians and go only for top league authors. So I was a bit reluctant to buy what I regarded as a ‘chancer’. I’m glad I did.  Not only does Michael Jones tell an exciting tale of a chivalrous knight’s life, but he brings to the table his detailed research and telling use of original sources including the letters of the man himself and his friends, as also using contemporary chronicles both French and English ( and others). You get a very rounded picture of a man who was extolled as the greatest warrior of his day but also a man who was extremely religious in this very religious age. Michael Jones doesn’t shy away from discussing his alleged ruthlessness and misdeeds either. It’s a great pity that Edward and his father Edward III had such differences and misunderstandings which led to the eventual loss of all that the Black Prince had gained in France. A pity too that he died so young. Nevertheless his name and aura live on and you can do much worse than enjoy this book as much as I did.

Another great history book ‘Bosworth’ by a well-known historian (and politician) tells in detail the71lmt42eeyl-copy-1.jpg story of how a Queen’s love match with a Welsh servant led eventually to the birth in a following generation of Henry Tudor and the successful if rather surprising overthrow of the Yorkist dynasty. Skidmore is an excellent guide to how all this led to its culmination in the Battle of Bosworth. He describes the background in terrific detail as well as giving us a blow by blow understanding of the battle itself. Well researched and told in a lively manner, the only criticism I would have is the lack of clarity at times as to who we are reading about. I can’t count the number of times I had to peruse the genealogical chart to see which Margaret or which Edward he was talking about. I can only assume all those reviewers who praised its clarity didn’t read it in as much detail and with as much care as I did! Still buying two history books which I didn’t want to put down is a good result……..9781509856251_1.jpg

This hardback book ‘Bomber Command’ was purchased as a £5 remainder at WHS. I have tried for some time now to research my father’s experience as a Bomb-aimer. No luck in getting his personal details so far and very frustrating considering I have his Forces ID number. However reading the book has given me an excellent idea of how lucky he was to survive, how brave he and the others were, how professional, and I also can appreciate why he didn’t say very much about his experiences and why he had a lifelong antipathy to war and armed struggles of all kinds. The only time we had a short chat he told me how sometimes when a plane returned they would literally have to hose out the remains of the Rear Gunner. I felt I couldn’t really take it any further, but as historian myself I really really should have done! ‘Bomber Command’ is terrific for the details but also covers the overall strategy and the controversies that have arisen since. Max Hastings is willing to be more critical of the key personnel involved than some other historians, but I found the research and output very balanced indeed. £5? A great buy!

 

 

 

Gardening in February…..

No two ways about it gardening can be hard work and because of the weather we have started early this year. My son helped dismantle the rotten pergola but then there was still a lot of clearing up to do. A new one should be in place in the next month or two…20190221_152657 copy.jpg20190221_152304 copy.jpgApart from that, the garden is lovelier than this time last year. I really enjoy the benefits of global warning (if that is what they are).20190220_144243 copy.jpg20190224_115017 copy.jpg20190224_115116 copy.jpgAnd it’s the same in our lanes…primroses and daffodils out, and wonderful days for walking (when its not raining that is)….20190224_120401 copy.jpg20190224_121637 copy.jpgLet’s hear more about the benefits and really make them work for us……..20190224_123426 copy.jpg20190224_123736 copy.jpg

A lovely walk to Padstow….

20190226_103505 copy.jpegWe catch the 11 bus from Liskeard to Wadebridge. I don’t say much about our local town Liskeard but when you look around it is quite a handsome place with a lot of good quality buildings. You can see from the sky why we decided to go to the seaside…..20190226_103515 copy.jpgFrom Wadebridge we catch a cute little local bus to Polzeath (pronounced Polzerth). We decided as we were in no hurry to have a good look around the beach there, so we walked towards the headland and returned via the houses – magnificent views and very expensive.20190226_131719 copy.jpgGood surfing conditions and a few were out….20190226_132159 copy.jpg20190226_133603 copy.jpgBut it was time for our walk now, so we joined the South West Coast Path towards Rock.20190226_134957 copy.jpglooking back now and again and……20190226_143635-copy.jpg20190226_134808 copy.jpg…..with the occasional stop for a drink (it  was warm when you escaped the wind). Along the way there are many smaller beaches with easy ways down….20190226_141727 copy.jpgI do like ‘Private’ signs. they encourage a more radical me…one who wants all land (as in Scotland) to be free access.20190226_142431 copy.jpgLooking ahead this is Daymer beach…..20190226_144147 copy.jpegWe walked through the magnificent dunes…20190226_145357 copy.jpegand of course what better at the end of a walk than a bit of light refreshment?20190226_151059 copy.jpegRather than walk up a steep hill through the residential road of exclusive Rock we took the ferry across to Padstow. Talking to the ferryman, when he closes at 4pm now but 6pm I think in Summer, there is a water taxi service should you wish to dine at one side or the other of the estuary and get back.20190226_153934 copy.jpegI thought the wellington dog was good….20190226_155732 copy.jpgOne of the trawlers in Padstow harbour seemed particularly colourful……20190226_160450 copy.jpgand all was still……..time for the bus home.20190226_160538 copy.jpg

Flat hunting in Fowey…..

I have always had a desire to live in Fowey…and on this beautiful February day who could gainsay me? I had after many years of looking found on-line a flat that seemed to be in our price range. It, or rather they, for we looked at four or five flats, of one and two bedrooms, in the same building, were located at the Bodinnick ferry crossing. They were very nice but unfortunately just too small. Anyhow another good excuse to come to Fowey…….20190225_114614 copy.jpg20190225_123302 copy.jpg20190225_123631 copy.jpeg20190225_124052 copy.jpg20190225_124535 copy.jpg20190225_124544 2 copy.jpeg20190225_123959 copy.jpg20190225_124032 copy.jpegOn the way back we called in to the Cormorant Hotel at Golant  for a drink. This is the view from their car park….20190225_130606 copy.jpgand terrace…wonderful. Unfortunately the hotel was closed for a few days for renewal, but we had a nice chat with the owner and will certainly be back.20190225_130706 copy.jpg

Doors and surfaces in Looe….

20190219_105502 copy.jpgA lot of house walls and boundary walls in Cornwall have a veritable small world of green growth……they are almost becoming Cornish hedges.20190221_105737 copy.jpg20190221_105755 copy.jpgYou don’t see many bricks but some incorporate ‘Looe bricks’ as a design feature…20190221_105534 copy.jpg………..and here is the explanation for Looe bricks on a little glass panel to be found in a bus shelter on the front at Hannafore….20190222_110847 copy.jpeg20190224_122539 copy.jpgI do love this feature in a tall wall at the end of the bridge in Looe……’Repeared By Ye County 1689’…..20190222_112824 copy.jpg20190221_105910 copy.jpgIt wasn’t such a nice day when we were there this time!20190222_111756 copy.jpg

Tears at the opera…….not mine this time

1600x685_fille4.jpgSaturday night at the New York’s Met, well Vue cinema Plymouth actually. A surprisingly large attendance, but the average age was let’s say over 60 – as usual. I really think a younger age profile would enjoy Opera so much. I was only introduced to it in my sixties, and am trying to make up for lost time. It’s great. Now I had never heard of  Donizetti’s ‘La Fille Du Regiment’ but as soon as the excellent orchestra and conductor played the overtures you wondered why not. A breezy introduction to what followed set just the right mood for this comic opera. The usual corny back-story….here’s the Met’s summary…..

ACT I

The Tyrolean mountains. On their way to Austria, the terrified Marquise of Berkenfield and her butler, Hortensius, have paused in their journey because they have found the French army blocking their way. When the marquise hears from the villagers that the French troops have at last retreated, she comments on the crude ways of the French people (“Pour une femme de mon nom”). Hortensius asks Sulpice, sergeant of the 21st regiment, to let the marquise continue on. Sulpice is joined by Marie, the mascot, or “daughter,” of the regiment, which adopted her as an orphaned child. When Sulpice questions her about a young man she has been seen with, she explains that he is a local Tyrolean who—though an enemy—once saved her life. Troops of the 21st arrive with a prisoner: this same Tyrolean, Tonio, who says he has been looking for Marie. She steps in to save him, and while he toasts his new friends, Marie sings the regimental song (“Chacun le sait”). Tonio is ordered to follow the soldiers, but he escapes and returns to declare his love to Marie. Sulpice surprises them, and Marie must admit to Tonio that she can only marry a soldier from the 21st.

The Marquise of Berkenfield asks Sulpice for an escort to return her to her castle. When he hears the name Berkenfield, Sulpice remembers a letter he discovered near the young Marie when she was found. The marquise soon admits that she knew the girl’s father and says that Marie is the long-lost daughter of her sister. The child had been left in the care of the marquise, but was lost on a battlefield. Shocked by the girl’s rough manners, the marquise is determined to take her niece to her castle and to give her a proper education. Tonio has enlisted so that he can marry Marie (“Ah, mes amis”), but she has to leave both her regiment and the man she loves (“Il faut partir”).

ACT II

 

The marquise has arranged a marriage between Marie and Scipion, nephew of the Duchess of Krakenthorp. Sulpice has joined the marquise at the Berkenfield castle, recovering from an injury and supposed to help her with her plans. The marquise gives Marie a singing lesson, accompanying her at the piano. Encouraged by Sulpice, Marie slips in phrases of the regimental song, and the marquise loses her temper (Trio: “Le jour naissait dans la bocage”). Left alone, Marie thinks about the meaninglessness of money and position (“Par le rang et l’opulence”). She hears soldiers marching in the distance and is delighted when the whole regiment files into the hall. Tonio, Marie, and Sulpice are reunited. Tonio asks for Marie’s hand, declaring that Marie is his whole life (“Pour me rapprocher de Marie”), but the marquise declares her niece engaged to another man and dismisses Tonio. Alone with Sulpice, the marquise confesses the truth: Marie is her own illegitimate daughter whom she abandoned, fearing social disgrace.

Hortensius announces the arrival of the wedding party, headed by the Duchess of Krakenthorp. Marie refuses to leave her room, but when Sulpice tells her that the marquise is her mother, the surprised girl declares that she cannot go against her mother’s wishes and agrees to marry a man that she does not love. As she is about to sign the marriage contract, the soldiers of the 21st regiment, led by Tonio, storm in to rescue their “daughter.” The noble guests are horrified to learn that Marie was a canteen girl, but they change their opinion when she describes her upbringing, telling them that she can never repay the debt she owes the soldiers. The marquise is so moved that she gives her daughter permission to marry Tonio. Everyone joins in a final “Salut à la France.”

 

As is normal with these live broadcast events there is an opera star to introduce things and talk to set designers, producers, etc and also to the stars taking part – during the interval,  in the middle of their performances, which is quite something. All very American and very enjoyable. The other quintessentially American thing was the lavishing of praise on the main sponsors. It does make one think how generous American benefactors are compared to their British equivalents – something I have been reading about recently.

The main leads were terrific, astonishingly good, even though Sulpice had a cold. The South African soprano Pretty Yende was Marie. yende-pretty.jpgShe could have been the star of the show but wasn’t only because tenor Javier Camarena was so so good.

merlin_150231453_a33a8efb-2598-4625-bf14-265abfd01b31-jumbo.jpgThe opera is renowned for it being a feast of bel canto vocal fireworks—including the show-stopping tenor aria “Ah! Mes amis … Pour mon âme,” with its nine high Cs. This took the real Met audience by storm and they were standing and shouting for more, and so sustained was this and so full of the moment was Javier that the tears started to trickle down his face. No acting there! An encore was called for and given. An amazing feat in opera apparently, and we could see why.  In some senses Javier with his short stature and ordinary looks is such an unlikely hero but wow did he steal the show. It was a real privilege to see this performance and massively enjoyable. Apart from the singing it was brilliantly staged and there was even an old big-screen star – Kathleen Turner – to enjoy in her speaking-only part. Her duel with the conductor was memorable. We enjoyed the music, but an Italian composer bulling up the French post-Napoleon? We discovered afterwards that Donizetti left his patron the King of Naples because he was being censored and felt free to do as he wished in Paris. All in all a wonderful evening. And back in time for Match of the Day.

Doors and Surfaces in Fowey……

20190218_132914 copy.jpgYet another trip to the tip and another trip to Fowey as a reward. Parking free at this time of year. Great. Some Edwardian houses we hadn’t really noticed before gleaming in the bright sunshine on this February day. Fairly quiet although half-term, and a pleasure to wander around the streets.20190218_133649 copy.jpg20190218_132934 copy.jpgI thought I would use this trip to take some shots of the typically Cornish surfaces, and doorways. Interesting I think.20190218_133226 copy.jpg20190218_133234 copy.jpg20190218_145233 copy.jpg20190218_133251 copy.jpg20190218_133312 copy.jpg20190218_133729 copy.jpg20190218_140746 copy.jpgThis time we wandered down through town to the Bodinnick ferry with a view across to Daphne Du Maurier’s house Ferryside.20190218_142655 copy.jpegLiveable houses down here too!20190218_143003 copy.jpgI liked the idea of having my boat slung under the house ready for action and a quick get-away! Good view of Ferryside on the opposite bank….20190218_143040 copy.jpgThis shot shows that Fowey and environs isn’t all about pretty houses and views…you can just see the china clay works downriver……20190218_143051 copy.jpgThe statue at the ferry terminus is rather good…20190218_144639_001 copy.jpgand always interesting to look inside the RNLI station….we donated.20190218_144445 copy.jpgYou are nearly always guaranteed a good view with a pint in Fowey….here from The King of Prussia……20190218_134453 copy 2.jpeg20190218_142205 copy.jpegNow for some doors…..and door-knockers….20190218_142217 copy.jpg20190218_142524 copy.jpg20190218_142539 copy.jpg20190218_143224 copy.jpeg20190218_142554 copy.jpeg20190218_150851 copy.jpg20190218_145516 copy.jpg20190218_150041 copy.jpegThen on the way back I noticed the old house of Q, or Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch, with its plaque.20190218_150408 copy.jpg

Heaving spent a little time as a journalist in London he returned to Cornwall in 1891, and settled in Fowey. In addition to publishing a series of critical articles, he completed Robert Louis Stevenson’s unfinished novel, “St Ives”. He was also known as a writer of excellent verse and a compiler of poetic works, most notably the “Oxford Book of English Verse, 1250-1900”, which appeared in 1900. This book is often quoted by John Mortimer’s “Rumpole of the Bailey”.                                                                                                             Quiller-Couch was an active worker in local politics for the Liberal party. He was also Commodore of the Royal Fowey Yacht Club from 1911 until his death. He was knighted in 1910 and received a professorship of English at Cambridge in 1912. He retained this post for the remainder of his life. He later became Chair of English at the university and oversaw the beginnings of the English Faculty there.                                                               Many of Quiller-Couch’s fictional works have been long neglected but contain a wealth of Cornish folk lore. He was a noted literary critic, and published several volumes of criticism. He died in 1944, leaving his autobiography, “Memories and Opinions”, unfinished. This was published the following year. His novel, “Castle Dor” was also unfinished on Quiller-Couch’s death, and his daughter asked her friend Daphne du Maurier to complete this version of Tristan and Isolde, set in 19th century Cornwall.

Perranporth and other beaches on the North Coast…..

20190214_124516 copy.jpgWe were trying to find the beach we had visited when first in Cornwall that has a small boardwalk and freshwater pond in the dunes. We thought it might be Perranporth so that is where we headed. We were wrong. Perranporth is the beach with a good bar/restaurant right on the beach and ‘unofficial’ nude bathing at the far end. What a lovely February day, and no Photoshop here!20190214_131944-copy.jpeg20190214_125156 copy.jpeg20190214_130211 copy.jpgAt the far end, having encountered no nudes unfortunately, we climbed up the Coast Path to a viewing point. The bench was obviously constructed for Giants as you can see!20190214_130317 copy.jpg20190214_130346 copy.jpg20190214_130627 copy.jpeg20190214_131715 copy.jpgNext to Trevaunce Cove….never been here before and a quaint harbour and beach (mostly covered when we were there). A fascinating place indeed. 20190214_140951 copy.jpegMost of the Cove is designated as an SSI because of the interesting geology and exposed lodes, and the village of St Agnes just above here was famous for its high quality tin….the last mine closing in 1941. There were outcrops of pure tin on the beach itself which were worked at low tide, others running under the sea, and more in the cliff face. Some of the spoil is still visible on the cliff top…….This little cove in its time was a real hive of industrial activity with hammer mills, loading of ships and much else apart from the mines themselves. However over a period of almost 400 years five attempts were made at constructing a harbour…all failed due to the rough seas. Huge granite slabs just washed away. On of the attempts was by Winstanley of Eddystone lighthouse fame.20190214_142139 copy.jpgTrevaunce was also a fishery and the odd fishing boat remains as a reminder of the past…20190214_141529 copy.jpegWe climbed the cliffs and sat on the lowest bench I have come across (Guinness Book of Records?) to watch the surfers at play.20190214_142631 copy.jpeg20190214_142556 copy.jpgWe then adjourned to the Driftwood Spars pub and brewery for a pint. The name stems from the huge beams (or spars) that comprise its structure, salvaged from shipwrecks along the coast and utilised for the building in the 1650s. The pub began life as a tin mining warehouse and has since been a chandlery, sail making loft and fish cellar, before it was eventually  converted into a hotel and bar in the early 1900s.20190214_143638 copy.jpegSuitably refreshed off we went to have one more try at finding the elusive beach of memory. Success at last, it was Holywell Bay, just as charming as we remembered!…..with its freshwater pool and river…20190214_153615 copy.jpgnice little boardwalk….20190214_153339 copy.jpg20190214_153350 copy.jpgand beautiful dunes…..20190214_153543 copy.jpg20190214_153846 copy.jpegThe beach was pretty fantastic too…..20190214_154037 copy.jpeg20190214_154936 copy.jpegA lovely day by the seaside full of interest, and only 50 minutes away by car. Marvellous.

Landing craft in Looe, lunch in Fowey….

20190206_112454 copy.jpgOn our regular walk in Looe we saw a landing craft hover in the retreating sea outside Looe (the tide was almost at its lowest), and then make up its mind and beach. We have absolutely no idea what all this was about, but it did attract attention! Having then to take some garden rubbish to the tip we used the opportunity of going on a bit further to Fowey one of my all-time favourite places. We had lunch and a pint at the Ship Inn which we had never been in before – a traditional pub with roaring fire – perfect on a cold day.20190213_132916 copy.jpg20190213_132920.jpgAfter a nice stroll through town we climbed the steps to the hotel now renamed as The Fowey Harbour Hotel  where we had a coffee.  Part of a group, but with reasonable taste….20190213_145706 copy.jpgand great views from where we were sitting in the bar\lounge…..20190213_145711 copy.jpegthey seem to have copied the ‘wellies’ idea from Olga Polizzi’s Tresanton Hotel in St Mawes…..20190213_152432 copy.jpg

Lunch at Spires restaurant Truro….

20190204_134900.jpegHaving raved about the Truro and Penwith College restaurant in Penzance – Senara – we thought we would try their sister operation in Truro. “It’s run entirely by our Professional Cookery and Professional Food and Beverage students, who gain valuable experience whilst working towards their qualifications.” Three courses for £10…..you can’t go wrong. Here’s their sample lunch menu…

Example lunch menu

Spicy roast pumpkin and sweet potato soup.
Smoked mackerel tian with pickled cucumber and crostini.
Mozzarella with broad beans, mint, lemon, olive oil and pea shoots.

Slow roasted belly of pork on puy lentil and chorizo broth with curly kale.
Battered pollock with hand-cooked chips, crushed peas, pea puree and deconstructed tartar sauce.
Gnocchi with roasted vegetables, tomato sauce & pesto.

Autumn Eton Mess.
Lemon tart with clotted cream.
Cornish cheeses with chutney and oatcakes.

What I have to say is that although we would definitely recommend Spires- it is incredible value, and we would go there again, – it didn’t come anywhere near to the standard of Senara. Strange in one way as they are part of the same organisation, but then again the staff are different so I wonder whether that is where the difference lies. Do they sample each other’s fare? Perhaps not. At Senara it started with the bread beautifully made, tasty and a choice on offer. At Spires we were given white bread which wasn’t fully cooked through. And the different courses each had their small failings….salad not picked through, no dressing etc etc. Still we enjoyed ourselves. We then tootled off to Truro on the Park and Ride to spend my book token in Waterstone’s. Walking through Truro is always a pleasure with plenty of fine buildings and the streetscape is great. City Hall we noticed had closed – it is being converted into flats I believe. This was where the TI was located where we wanted to get some bus timetables, 20190204_154502 copy.jpegbut right opposite is the new TI which is really really good. here is a little seating area just as you enter…..very jolly!20190204_154643 copy.jpgJust to the left is the old ‘Coinage Hall’  so-called because of Truro’s past status as a Stannery. The current building is Victorian. 20190204_154714.jpgGranite cobbles and kerbstones impart a lot of character as does the leat system for water thought to be a system the Victorians used as for street cleansing and drinking water for horses.20190204_154843 copy.jpgTruro’s cathedral is obviously prominent in the town but on a day with cloudless skies it is magnificent.20190204_154903 copy.jpeg20190204_155140_001 copy.jpeg20190204_155158 copy.jpg20190204_155239 copy.jpgTruro is less than an hour by car for us so a great place to visit. The weather hasn’t all been blue skies as these recent pics of our garden show….20190131_162904 copy.jpg20190119_104607 copy.jpg20190119_104614 copy.jpgbut we like our walk along the local lanes whatever the weather, particularly just now when the wildflowers are starting to appear in the Cornish hedges….20190119_161038 copy.jpg20190119_163606 copy.jpg20190202_162206 copy.jpg