Lunch at Spires restaurant Truro….

20190204_134900.jpegHaving raved about the Truro and Penwith College restaurant in Penzance – Senara – we thought we would try their sister operation in Truro. “It’s run entirely by our Professional Cookery and Professional Food and Beverage students, who gain valuable experience whilst working towards their qualifications.” Three courses for £10…..you can’t go wrong. Here’s their sample lunch menu…

Example lunch menu

Spicy roast pumpkin and sweet potato soup.
Smoked mackerel tian with pickled cucumber and crostini.
Mozzarella with broad beans, mint, lemon, olive oil and pea shoots.

Slow roasted belly of pork on puy lentil and chorizo broth with curly kale.
Battered pollock with hand-cooked chips, crushed peas, pea puree and deconstructed tartar sauce.
Gnocchi with roasted vegetables, tomato sauce & pesto.

Autumn Eton Mess.
Lemon tart with clotted cream.
Cornish cheeses with chutney and oatcakes.

What I have to say is that although we would definitely recommend Spires- it is incredible value, and we would go there again, – it didn’t come anywhere near to the standard of Senara. Strange in one way as they are part of the same organisation, but then again the staff are different so I wonder whether that is where the difference lies. Do they sample each other’s fare? Perhaps not. At Senara it started with the bread beautifully made, tasty and a choice on offer. At Spires we were given white bread which wasn’t fully cooked through. And the different courses each had their small failings….salad not picked through, no dressing etc etc. Still we enjoyed ourselves. We then tootled off to Truro on the Park and Ride to spend my book token in Waterstone’s. Walking through Truro is always a pleasure with plenty of fine buildings and the streetscape is great. City Hall we noticed had closed – it is being converted into flats I believe. This was where the TI was located where we wanted to get some bus timetables, 20190204_154502 copy.jpegbut right opposite is the new TI which is really really good. here is a little seating area just as you enter…..very jolly!20190204_154643 copy.jpgJust to the left is the old ‘Coinage Hall’  so-called because of Truro’s past status as a Stannery. The current building is Victorian. 20190204_154714.jpgGranite cobbles and kerbstones impart a lot of character as does the leat system for water thought to be a system the Victorians used as for street cleansing and drinking water for horses.20190204_154843 copy.jpgTruro’s cathedral is obviously prominent in the town but on a day with cloudless skies it is magnificent.20190204_154903 copy.jpeg20190204_155140_001 copy.jpeg20190204_155158 copy.jpg20190204_155239 copy.jpgTruro is less than an hour by car for us so a great place to visit. The weather hasn’t all been blue skies as these recent pics of our garden show….20190131_162904 copy.jpg20190119_104607 copy.jpg20190119_104614 copy.jpgbut we like our walk along the local lanes whatever the weather, particularly just now when the wildflowers are starting to appear in the Cornish hedges….20190119_161038 copy.jpg20190119_163606 copy.jpg20190202_162206 copy.jpg

Reading matters……

Ill-Keep-You-Safe-262x400.jpgAnother of F.’s books, I just got in first again. Peter May is a Crime writer, but for the greater part of this book I wondered where this was going in terms of a Crime plot. It seemed more ‘Welcome to the island of Harris – we’ll tell you some things you didn’t know about this special place’. Well it certainly is special. But I couldn’t help thinking all along that my son had spent a week there with his school pal who comes from Harris and he has always said ‘Never again’. What a dispiriting place it seems. So, the plot. The two protagonists own a company that makes an upmarket alternative to Harris Tweed, one of them is blown up by a car bomb in Paris. There is a desultory search for the perpetrators. Some off-beam characters are drawn as possible suspects and then, right at the end, and as obvious as obvious can be, the partner turns out not to have been blown up after all. Weak. I would say so. I was thoroughly disappointed at the end and rather glad to get onto something else.

Sarah Langford’s ‘In Your Defence’ is one of those brilliant books that keep you up at9781784163082.jpg night, that you don’t want to put down, you don’t want to end, and which teaches you so much you didn’t know. Whilst it was her love of words that inspired her to take up the law, Sarah took an unprivileged, unconventional route that however stood her in good stead and made her determined to succeed in what is still a profession full of privilege and some bias against women. However this story is not about her it is very much about her clients, and in particular 11 clients in 11 different cases which she outlines in some detail. Each case starts with the location of the trial (changed along with personal details to protect clients’ anonymity) and a tiny note on the law involved in the particular case. These get your mind racing before you know anything about the case.  Sarah then takes us through each story from start to finish. All of the cases are to do with Family or Criminal Law. And wow how you get involved. Of course her job is to represent clients whether she believes them innocent or guilty, and to us looking in from the outside, this in itself poses incredible moral dilemmas. But, as she says herself,  “Life is not binary,” “There is very rarely a situation where there is no other version of the story.” Intricate points of Law are explained in notes at the end of the book. The cases range from a woman charged with conspiracy after a burglary, and a young man accused of assaulting three police officers during an arrest that leaves him with cuts and bruises on his hand, ribs and head to a child whose views are, unusually, taken into account in deciding which of his divorced parents he should live with. You come away feeling battered, hugely impressed with the Judges and Barristers involved, and scandalised by how little someone like Sarah is rewarded for the efforts she puts in. A thrilling book.