Doors and Surfaces in Fowey……

20190218_132914 copy.jpgYet another trip to the tip and another trip to Fowey as a reward. Parking free at this time of year. Great. Some Edwardian houses we hadn’t really noticed before gleaming in the bright sunshine on this February day. Fairly quiet although half-term, and a pleasure to wander around the streets.20190218_133649 copy.jpg20190218_132934 copy.jpgI thought I would use this trip to take some shots of the typically Cornish surfaces, and doorways. Interesting I think.20190218_133226 copy.jpg20190218_133234 copy.jpg20190218_145233 copy.jpg20190218_133251 copy.jpg20190218_133312 copy.jpg20190218_133729 copy.jpg20190218_140746 copy.jpgThis time we wandered down through town to the Bodinnick ferry with a view across to Daphne Du Maurier’s house Ferryside.20190218_142655 copy.jpegLiveable houses down here too!20190218_143003 copy.jpgI liked the idea of having my boat slung under the house ready for action and a quick get-away! Good view of Ferryside on the opposite bank….20190218_143040 copy.jpgThis shot shows that Fowey and environs isn’t all about pretty houses and views…you can just see the china clay works downriver……20190218_143051 copy.jpgThe statue at the ferry terminus is rather good…20190218_144639_001 copy.jpgand always interesting to look inside the RNLI station….we donated.20190218_144445 copy.jpgYou are nearly always guaranteed a good view with a pint in Fowey….here from The King of Prussia……20190218_134453 copy 2.jpeg20190218_142205 copy.jpegNow for some doors…..and door-knockers….20190218_142217 copy.jpg20190218_142524 copy.jpg20190218_142539 copy.jpg20190218_143224 copy.jpeg20190218_142554 copy.jpeg20190218_150851 copy.jpg20190218_145516 copy.jpg20190218_150041 copy.jpegThen on the way back I noticed the old house of Q, or Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch, with its plaque.20190218_150408 copy.jpg

Heaving spent a little time as a journalist in London he returned to Cornwall in 1891, and settled in Fowey. In addition to publishing a series of critical articles, he completed Robert Louis Stevenson’s unfinished novel, “St Ives”. He was also known as a writer of excellent verse and a compiler of poetic works, most notably the “Oxford Book of English Verse, 1250-1900”, which appeared in 1900. This book is often quoted by John Mortimer’s “Rumpole of the Bailey”.                                                                                                             Quiller-Couch was an active worker in local politics for the Liberal party. He was also Commodore of the Royal Fowey Yacht Club from 1911 until his death. He was knighted in 1910 and received a professorship of English at Cambridge in 1912. He retained this post for the remainder of his life. He later became Chair of English at the university and oversaw the beginnings of the English Faculty there.                                                               Many of Quiller-Couch’s fictional works have been long neglected but contain a wealth of Cornish folk lore. He was a noted literary critic, and published several volumes of criticism. He died in 1944, leaving his autobiography, “Memories and Opinions”, unfinished. This was published the following year. His novel, “Castle Dor” was also unfinished on Quiller-Couch’s death, and his daughter asked her friend Daphne du Maurier to complete this version of Tristan and Isolde, set in 19th century Cornwall.

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