Perranporth and other beaches on the North Coast…..

20190214_124516 copy.jpgWe were trying to find the beach we had visited when first in Cornwall that has a small boardwalk and freshwater pond in the dunes. We thought it might be Perranporth so that is where we headed. We were wrong. Perranporth is the beach with a good bar/restaurant right on the beach and ‘unofficial’ nude bathing at the far end. What a lovely February day, and no Photoshop here!20190214_131944-copy.jpeg20190214_125156 copy.jpeg20190214_130211 copy.jpgAt the far end, having encountered no nudes unfortunately, we climbed up the Coast Path to a viewing point. The bench was obviously constructed for Giants as you can see!20190214_130317 copy.jpg20190214_130346 copy.jpg20190214_130627 copy.jpeg20190214_131715 copy.jpgNext to Trevaunce Cove….never been here before and a quaint harbour and beach (mostly covered when we were there). A fascinating place indeed. 20190214_140951 copy.jpegMost of the Cove is designated as an SSI because of the interesting geology and exposed lodes, and the village of St Agnes just above here was famous for its high quality tin….the last mine closing in 1941. There were outcrops of pure tin on the beach itself which were worked at low tide, others running under the sea, and more in the cliff face. Some of the spoil is still visible on the cliff top…….This little cove in its time was a real hive of industrial activity with hammer mills, loading of ships and much else apart from the mines themselves. However over a period of almost 400 years five attempts were made at constructing a harbour…all failed due to the rough seas. Huge granite slabs just washed away. On of the attempts was by Winstanley of Eddystone lighthouse fame.20190214_142139 copy.jpgTrevaunce was also a fishery and the odd fishing boat remains as a reminder of the past…20190214_141529 copy.jpegWe climbed the cliffs and sat on the lowest bench I have come across (Guinness Book of Records?) to watch the surfers at play.20190214_142631 copy.jpeg20190214_142556 copy.jpgWe then adjourned to the Driftwood Spars pub and brewery for a pint. The name stems from the huge beams (or spars) that comprise its structure, salvaged from shipwrecks along the coast and utilised for the building in the 1650s. The pub began life as a tin mining warehouse and has since been a chandlery, sail making loft and fish cellar, before it was eventually  converted into a hotel and bar in the early 1900s.20190214_143638 copy.jpegSuitably refreshed off we went to have one more try at finding the elusive beach of memory. Success at last, it was Holywell Bay, just as charming as we remembered!…..with its freshwater pool and river…20190214_153615 copy.jpgnice little boardwalk….20190214_153339 copy.jpg20190214_153350 copy.jpgand beautiful dunes…..20190214_153543 copy.jpg20190214_153846 copy.jpegThe beach was pretty fantastic too…..20190214_154037 copy.jpeg20190214_154936 copy.jpegA lovely day by the seaside full of interest, and only 50 minutes away by car. Marvellous.

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