Gardening in February…..

No two ways about it gardening can be hard work and because of the weather we have started early this year. My son helped dismantle the rotten pergola but then there was still a lot of clearing up to do. A new one should be in place in the next month or two…20190221_152657 copy.jpg20190221_152304 copy.jpgApart from that, the garden is lovelier than this time last year. I really enjoy the benefits of global warning (if that is what they are).20190220_144243 copy.jpg20190224_115017 copy.jpg20190224_115116 copy.jpgAnd it’s the same in our lanes…primroses and daffodils out, and wonderful days for walking (when its not raining that is)….20190224_120401 copy.jpg20190224_121637 copy.jpgLet’s hear more about the benefits and really make them work for us……..20190224_123426 copy.jpg20190224_123736 copy.jpg

A Glorious January Day…

Having just seen an episode of Flog It! from Mount Edgcumbe, and as it was such a nice day that is where we headed. The views on the coast road come from left and right….in this lay-by Plymouth is over the Sound to our left and to the right is Tregantle fort which had its red flag out signifying live shooting.20190109_121607.jpg20190109_121652.jpgSometimes you believe you are surrounded by a landscape of water with the sea on one side and numerous creeks and inlets to the side, in front and behind…20190109_122616.jpgWe started off at the bottom end of the Edgcumbe estate with a drink in front of the fire at the Edgcumbe Arms. This then steeled us to face the cold but beautiful day.20190109_130534.jpgFirst stop the Orangery…20190109_131135.jpgWe then made our way along the coastal edge of the estate taking in various temples and follies….20190109_131517.jpgOne of the gun batteries showed how strategically placed Edgcumbe is – looking out over Plymouth Hoe, and one of the many very good information boards showed the location of an amazing number of shipwrecks in this part of the Sound. I would have thought that when you had made these waters you were safe – but apparently not!20190109_132038.jpgThe path took us through various parts of the garden which we hadn’t seen before…20190109_132315.jpg20190109_132735.jpegand we noticed our first burst of Camellias….20190109_133755.jpgThis is ‘Milton’s Temple, c. 1755 – a circular Ionian temple, with a plaque inscribed with lines from the poem Paradise Lost, “overhead up grew, Insuperable heights of loftiest shade…..” John Milton, (1608–1674)’.20190109_134103.jpeg20190109_134357.jpeg20190109_134609.jpegThe walk was not without its efforts, but all very worthwhile and we saw very few people indeed which was good.20190109_140208.jpgI intended to climb this folly I think for the views but on approaching it I noted some very serious snogging going on at the top level, so I left well alone!20190109_141133.jpeg20190109_141323.jpgFrom here I tried out my panorama mode….not too bad……20190109_141615 2.jpegand it was just past here that we noted that the grounds do contain the National Camellia Collection….what a cheering sight on this winter’s day……..20190109_142213.jpeg20190109_142330.jpg20190109_142539.jpg20190109_142653.jpgBack at the house we visited the Stables area where all the trades used to be located – the blacksmith, wood turner and so on, all the buildings now used by independent crafts people……20190109_143450.jpg20190109_144027.jpegThe house itself is not open until April….20190109_144304.jpeg20190109_144322.jpgWe made our way back to the car along a splendid avenue of trees……..20190109_144935_001.jpgDays like this, cold and clear, remind us of winter days in York……they should be enjoyed to the full.

A Something and Nothing Walk……

20190107_122715.jpgLooking at our local map we saw that there was a potential new walk from Duloe, the next village to us. It did have some rather sharp contour lines, but looked promising. There are no public footpath walks from St Keyne, our village, which is a shame, although we do constantly walk along the lanes. Anyhow, off we set. First of all there were some rather lovely catkins decorating a few trees at the start of the walk. Then, after crossing the dry bed of a little stream….20190107_122924.jpgwe walked through an orchard which belongs to Cornish Orchards well-known now throughout the country for their cider and other drinks. We must return when the blossom is out, and then later see the apples themselves (maybe a bit of scrumping?). 20190107_122948.jpgWe descended sharply to the valley bottom through Duchy land to a little hamlet of holiday cottages. Unfortunately as we reached the road……. 20190107_124541.jpg…….someone yet again had blighted the landscape with uncaring dumping of litter. Who are these people? Well, on the way back up to Duloe on the lanes I noted a discarded outer of Carling Lager, and scattered for a mile or so along the hedgerow I counted about 10 cans of Carling. Idiots all these people.20190107_130525.jpgThere was a rather nice cottage on the way up which had a lovely rustic gateway which added to the view…..I do so like the gates and stiles and crossing points you see on country walks and often take pictures showing the huge differences in regional styles (not a pun!). I really would like to write a booklet for the Shire series of esoteric books. One day, perhaps.20190107_131356.jpg20190107_131550.jpgWe noted some wildflowers in bloom, and when we had finished our walk I drove to the edge of Duloe……. 20190107_131448.jpgto take a picture of a clump of daffodils that have been in flower since December…..this bank where they are is full of daffodils in Spring, so I am frankly amazed at this one clump with no sign whatsoever of any others….perhaps a very early variety anyhow.20190107_140349.jpgOther things are blossoming at this time in Cornwall…here a camellia and…… 20190101_130546.jpg….in our own garden this azalea has been in flower since at least early December, probably November.20190101_155343.jpgWell, we did our 8000 steps, but I don’t think we’ll be in too much of a hurry to do the walk again. It was a little uninspiring……