A birthday weekend……

20190809_180259_003 copy.jpegKatherine and Aiisha came hot-foot from Spain to share a birthday weekend. My 70th. On our way to our first ‘adventure’ – ice  skating at the Pavilions in Plymouth, we passed Charles Church, bombed out during the war but given almost a sculptural quality with the background of the Drake Shopping Centre. It almost seems planned to set the old church off….perhaps it was. Skating was good. The next day we chose to have lunch at the Duchy Garden Centre so that Katherine could look at some plants for her new garden in Edinburgh. Aiisha and I decamped for a short while to the new children area which was very nice indeed…….20190810_130928 copy.jpgand we loved the wheeled gypsy hut, where Aiisha showed off her versatility with her Dad’s instrument of choice…20190810_131147 copy.jpg                Lunch over we set off for Carlyon Bay where Katherine had bought tickets for a show by the Knee-High Theatre Company called The Dancing Frog. After a lacklustre start it developed into a really really fun show. I haven’t enjoyed myself as much for a long time, and I really must write them a review. Pleasure and laughs were had by all and I did think the puppetry was amazing. Ten out of ten. The audience of all ages were captivated.20190810_154028 copy.jpeg20190810_154028 2 copy.jpeg20190810_154807 copy.jpegWe then couldn’t’t resist the beach where the tail end of a storm was apparent. Luckily the weather held off for us.20190810_162034 copy.jpeg20190810_161453 copy.jpeg20190810_161810 copy.jpegThe biggest ‘adventure’ perhaps came the next day when we visited the nearby and well-named Adrenalin Quarry. Neither F. nor I were participants, but we certainly enjoyed watching. Katherine and Aiisha proved fearless in attempting first The Giant Swing…… 20190811_113306 copy.jpg20190811_113411 copy.jpgAQ copy.png  Apparently the first drop from what seemed an enormous height was ‘scary’ but thereafter things got a little better. Aiisha was heard to say in the gentler parts ‘I want to do it again’ at which those watching burst into laughter…they were absolutely stupefied that one so young had attempted this in the first place!z copy.jpgzz copy.jpgNext was the zip wire which went from the heights at one end of the quarry to the other. Not quite the longest or most terrifying in the world, but certainly up there. Rather them than me. Who knew such things were within 15 minutes drive of us?xx copy.jpgy copy.jpg55 copy.jpgtt copy.jpgWe then celebrated all that bravery with snacks in the nearby American Diner which was actually enjoyed by all of us.20190811_125612 copy.jpgWhilst Katherine did some work the next day, Frances, Aiisha and I drove to Looe to play the arcades as it was a bit inclement. We all had a great time playing the twopenny dip where you roll coins to displace other coins (and prizes). 20190811_160617 copy.jpgAiisha’s top said it all. Lucky. We won an enormous haul of sweets, of which you can see a part……20190811_162451 copy.jpgWe crossed the river on the little ferry for a change, and thoroughly enjoyed our trip to the seaside.20190811_165110 copy.jpg20190811_165236 copy.jpgAdventures were now coming thick and fast. A riding lesson got us up early the next day. After kitting out…….20190812_095620 copy.jpg              ……..Aiisha showed much aplomb in dealing with her horse – and with the lady instructor who was to say the least formidable. All the adults looking on were quaking in their shoes. However the lesson was indoor and out, and went down very well with our intrepid rider.20190812_100122 copy.jpegA fine day was then promised so we went on one of our favourite walks the circular route from Lerryn (our favourite Cornish village) to St Winnow. After stocking up at the terrific local stores we set off along the for now dryish river…20190812_114353 copy.jpgcrossing the medieval bridge…..20190812_114406 copy.jpgand crossing and re-crossing the stepping stones.20190812_114930 copy.jpgAll the cottages are without exception lovely and, unusually it seems to us, nearly all lived in as opposed to used or owned by holidaymakers. That accounts for the hugely lively village life.20190812_115229 copy.jpgOur first objective was a particular bench with a view, and this is where we had our pasties and cakes from the shop. One of the best lunches ever!20190812_122848 copy.jpg20190812_124241-copy.jpg20190812_123845 copy.jpgWe then aimed for St Winnow’s and along the way Aiisha picked up and fashioned her own walking stick which not only proved useful but also was a great prop for her impressions of “an old lady walking”. Very good.20190812_135107 copy.jpgThe church was bedecked for a wedding and whilst this was all very pretty, it had meant the closure of the ice cream stall. Not as disappointing as it might have been as we were all ftb. 20190812_135456 copy.jpgPulling up from the hamlet (just a farm and a cottage and a church (plus usually an ice cream stall!), we soon had good views.20190812_140929 copy.jpgThere were several kinds of trees with plenteous nuts (perhaps betokening a hard winter?).20190812_144929 copy.jpgAnd pretty garden fronts as we descended once more to Lerryn.20190812_154423 copy.jpgThe tide was now in. All in all a special day and a very long seven and a half miles for young feet…all done without a grumble!20190812_154654 copy.jpgOur last full day together was my birthday and we had lunch at the Godolphin Arms now turned into a somewhat boutique hotel. Sensational views from the car park…20190813_132054 copy.jpegand the restaurant where we eat well.20190813_133620 copy.jpegWe planned to look at the beautiful gardens on St Michael’s Mount but on the way to the ferry (the tide was in) we were waylaid. 20190813_151348 copy.jpegMarazion itself is quite captivating…….20190813_151519 copy.jpgSix ferries were in continuous use (it was Bank Holiday after all), so we didn’t wait too long.20190813_152505 copy.jpeg20190813_153138 copy.jpg20190813_153244 copy.jpegOn reaching the island we found the gardens were closed, but this enabled us to climb up to the castle itself, looking for the Giant’s Heart on the way up……20190813_161223 copy.jpg                    and making use of the odd canon for a resting point…..20190813_161802 copy.jpg20190813_161857 copy.jpgInside we did a rapid tour and completed a successful quiz, and enjoyed the special atmosphere of this amazing place. We also were able to see some of the gardens!20190813_163209 copy.jpg20190813_163711 copy.jpeg20190813_163841 copy.jpg                   The queues for the ferries to get back to the mainland were long to say the least, but we made our own amusements. 20190813_170641 copy.jpg

A lovely few days was completed when we dropped Katherine and Aiisha off for a night’s camping with friends. We escaped to a night of central heating and TV viewing at home! Don’t know who had the best bargain……….

Our first visit to Tresco….

tresco a (Custom).jpg   A last-minute decision to take advantage of the Locals offer (£25 each return)  to visit the Scillies again on a day trip meant an early start. The alarm was set for 5.45am and that proved just right. In arriving at Penzance we joined the small queue to pick up our tickets – the staff were incredibly helpful and efficient………20190716_080540 copy.jpgand in no time at all we were wandering along the harbour to board the Scillonian. 20190716_081614 copy.jpgThese are the mini containers which hold passengers’ luggage, but also anything and everything that the Scillies need that they don’t have or grow themselves.20190716_081145 copy.jpgSeeing Penzance like this early in the morning makes you wonder why you don’t get up early more often.20190716_081556 copy.jpegAnyhow we were soon settled in for the 2 hours 45 minutes journey with a coffee and lovely fresh warm pastry each and the Times crossword, sudoku, word wheel etc which are our daily attempt to activate our brains for the strenuous days of retirement.20190716_082625 copy.jpg The sea was placid, the day hot and sunny as we exited the harbour.20190716_092256 copy.jpegEverything secured nice and firmly….20190716_092319 copy.jpgIt’s always interesting to see places from a different angle…here Mousehole.20190716_093308 copy.jpgAnd it’s a joy to arrive in the scattered isles of the Scillies……20190716_120404 copy.jpegbefore berthing in St Mary’s……where we hopped off rather sharpish to ensure we made the inter-island ferry to Tresco our destination for the day.20190716_122623 copy.jpg5139361_b9c7efa9.jpgYou see all kinds of craft, and nearing Tresco……20190716_122949 copy.jpeg……….the incredible white-sanded beaches gleamed in the sun, and all of them were, as they often are apparently, practically deserted. Paradise!20190716_124731 copy.jpgPentle_1.jpgOn our walk to the Abbey and Gardens there were flowers galore growing wild..here one of my particular favourites Agapanthus…20190716_125107 copy.jpgand everything was super-sized…20190716_125646 copy.jpgAll this before we got to the Gardens….20190716_125656 copy.jpgBefore visiting the Gardens themselves we had a light lunch in their cafe sitting in the beflowered courtyard soaking up the sun. After that we were ready. Now if you don’t like pictures of flowers, plants, settings like the Garden of Eden look away now…….20190716_132506 copy.jpg20190716_132604 copy.jpgand there was wildlife too…here a magnificent Golden Pheasant…I don’t think you should be feeding them bananas but still. I also saw a red squirrel, apparently introduced on the island by Judy Dench’s husband of all people……20190716_132642 copy.jpegThe shapes against the blue sky were pretty special and the feeling you were in some tropical paradise, rather like the Eden project but all outside in real-life as it were, never left you.20190716_134021 copy.jpg20190716_133116 copy.jpg20190716_134651 copy.jpg20190716_133150 copy.jpeg20190716_133412 copy.jpg20190716_135247 copy.jpg20190716_133447 copy.jpgAnd it wasn’t just plants and flowers that were special, there was a huge range of modern sculpture something I would normally take with a pinch of salt but here somehow all very appropriate…..20190716_142039 copy.jpgThis particular sculpture of a balancing box lies below the Abbey house itself where the Dorrien-Smiths who own Tresco (yes it is a private island) live……20190716_134104 copy.jpgeven the well was turned into a piece of sculpture…..20190716_134345 copy.jpg20190716_134440 copy.jpg20190716_134725 copy.jpg20190716_135415 copy.jpegThe Shell House (1994), a pretty shell grotto designed and made by Lucy Dorrien-Smith, has a shell-themed tile floor, and individual initialled tiles commemorating members of the family can be seen amongst the shells on its internal walls. But the craftsmanship was incredible. The finest shell house I have seen, and I have seen a few.20190716_140010 copy.jpeg20190716_140022 copy.jpeg20190716_140126 copy.jpeg20190716_140236 copy.jpg20190716_143546 copy.jpg20190716_140429 copy.jpegTowards the end of our stroll around the gardens we happened upon a fruit and vegetable area which was patently not part of the main run of things. Our assumption was that this was maintained (in tip-top condition) for the Abbey owners themselves.20190716_140919 copy.jpgIt also contained cutting beds, again probably for the owners vases.20190716_141228 copy.jpgWe had the ferry to catch at 3.30pm to link up with the Scillonian, so we reluctantly left the gardens. On our way to New Grimsby a mile away we passed huge swathes of Agapanthus..20190716_142027 copy.jpgthe outside of the house itself….20190716_142445 copy.jpgand finally had beautiful vistas opening up of the sea……20190716_143824 copy.jpgI noted in the outskirts of the hamlet that they had even named a square after me (very nice of them)20190716_144332 copy.jpgand passing the beautiful cottages in their verdant setting we made our way….20190716_150912 copy.jpeg ……to the Flying Boat Bar and Bistro with its enviable views….where we just had time for a quick if very expensive pint no doubt delivered by the Scillonian and then ferried to the island….The_Flying_Boat_View_3.jpg

I end with a poem for Stephen Booth, who passed away in 2013. Stephen was a regular visitor to Tresco for fifty years and the poem was written by his brother, Ted Booth.

Tresco

What island is this

Prospero’s cell perhaps

there the grey beard goes

and isn’t that pretty gardener

Miranda in disguise

or are we all Crusoes

shipwrecked on the beach

waiting for man Friday

and a ready cooked pie

or is this Treasure Island

with Jim and Captain Flint

making for the village store

where X marks the spot

and untold treasures wait

or is it a mad hatter’s

golf course with untold buggies

criss crossing the greens

or has a bit of Barbados

broken loose and floated

its palm trees

across the Gulf Stream

and into our garden.

 

Ted Booth

December 2013

Afternoon tea at Fowey Hall……

luxury-family-hotels-fowey-hall-cornwall-eat-21.jpgAs part of our Christmas present from Katherine, we had a voucher for afternoon tea at the Fowey Hall Hotel. We had visited once before and came away extremely disgruntled with atrocious service. This time the service was impeccable.20190703_154216 copy.jpegThe tea was lovely, the weather great, and the setting and views tremendous.20190703_161809 copy.jpg20190703_162027 copy.jpg20190703_163624 copy.jpgAs you might expect we were sated and decided we had better work off some of the culinary inputs by steeply descending into Fowey.20190703_163910 copy.jpgSome people might regard Fowey as twee. But it is one of my all-time favourites.20190703_164213 copy.jpg20190703_164213.jpgThe harbour and town were busy. Whilst enjoying the views, staring down into the waters we couldn’t believe our  eyes when we saw a group of the most enormous jellyfish at least three or four feet long…..20190703_165421 copy.jpeg20190703_165455 copy.jpeg

A lovely walk to Padstow….

20190226_103505 copy.jpegWe catch the 11 bus from Liskeard to Wadebridge. I don’t say much about our local town Liskeard but when you look around it is quite a handsome place with a lot of good quality buildings. You can see from the sky why we decided to go to the seaside…..20190226_103515 copy.jpgFrom Wadebridge we catch a cute little local bus to Polzeath (pronounced Polzerth). We decided as we were in no hurry to have a good look around the beach there, so we walked towards the headland and returned via the houses – magnificent views and very expensive.20190226_131719 copy.jpgGood surfing conditions and a few were out….20190226_132159 copy.jpg20190226_133603 copy.jpgBut it was time for our walk now, so we joined the South West Coast Path towards Rock.20190226_134957 copy.jpglooking back now and again and……20190226_143635-copy.jpg20190226_134808 copy.jpg…..with the occasional stop for a drink (it  was warm when you escaped the wind). Along the way there are many smaller beaches with easy ways down….20190226_141727 copy.jpgI do like ‘Private’ signs. they encourage a more radical me…one who wants all land (as in Scotland) to be free access.20190226_142431 copy.jpgLooking ahead this is Daymer beach…..20190226_144147 copy.jpegWe walked through the magnificent dunes…20190226_145357 copy.jpegand of course what better at the end of a walk than a bit of light refreshment?20190226_151059 copy.jpegRather than walk up a steep hill through the residential road of exclusive Rock we took the ferry across to Padstow. Talking to the ferryman, when he closes at 4pm now but 6pm I think in Summer, there is a water taxi service should you wish to dine at one side or the other of the estuary and get back.20190226_153934 copy.jpegI thought the wellington dog was good….20190226_155732 copy.jpgOne of the trawlers in Padstow harbour seemed particularly colourful……20190226_160450 copy.jpgand all was still……..time for the bus home.20190226_160538 copy.jpg

Flat hunting in Fowey…..

I have always had a desire to live in Fowey…and on this beautiful February day who could gainsay me? I had after many years of looking found on-line a flat that seemed to be in our price range. It, or rather they, for we looked at four or five flats, of one and two bedrooms, in the same building, were located at the Bodinnick ferry crossing. They were very nice but unfortunately just too small. Anyhow another good excuse to come to Fowey…….20190225_114614 copy.jpg20190225_123302 copy.jpg20190225_123631 copy.jpeg20190225_124052 copy.jpg20190225_124535 copy.jpg20190225_124544 2 copy.jpeg20190225_123959 copy.jpg20190225_124032 copy.jpegOn the way back we called in to the Cormorant Hotel at Golant  for a drink. This is the view from their car park….20190225_130606 copy.jpgand terrace…wonderful. Unfortunately the hotel was closed for a few days for renewal, but we had a nice chat with the owner and will certainly be back.20190225_130706 copy.jpg

Doors and Surfaces in Fowey……

20190218_132914 copy.jpgYet another trip to the tip and another trip to Fowey as a reward. Parking free at this time of year. Great. Some Edwardian houses we hadn’t really noticed before gleaming in the bright sunshine on this February day. Fairly quiet although half-term, and a pleasure to wander around the streets.20190218_133649 copy.jpg20190218_132934 copy.jpgI thought I would use this trip to take some shots of the typically Cornish surfaces, and doorways. Interesting I think.20190218_133226 copy.jpg20190218_133234 copy.jpg20190218_145233 copy.jpg20190218_133251 copy.jpg20190218_133312 copy.jpg20190218_133729 copy.jpg20190218_140746 copy.jpgThis time we wandered down through town to the Bodinnick ferry with a view across to Daphne Du Maurier’s house Ferryside.20190218_142655 copy.jpegLiveable houses down here too!20190218_143003 copy.jpgI liked the idea of having my boat slung under the house ready for action and a quick get-away! Good view of Ferryside on the opposite bank….20190218_143040 copy.jpgThis shot shows that Fowey and environs isn’t all about pretty houses and views…you can just see the china clay works downriver……20190218_143051 copy.jpgThe statue at the ferry terminus is rather good…20190218_144639_001 copy.jpgand always interesting to look inside the RNLI station….we donated.20190218_144445 copy.jpgYou are nearly always guaranteed a good view with a pint in Fowey….here from The King of Prussia……20190218_134453 copy 2.jpeg20190218_142205 copy.jpegNow for some doors…..and door-knockers….20190218_142217 copy.jpg20190218_142524 copy.jpg20190218_142539 copy.jpg20190218_143224 copy.jpeg20190218_142554 copy.jpeg20190218_150851 copy.jpg20190218_145516 copy.jpg20190218_150041 copy.jpegThen on the way back I noticed the old house of Q, or Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch, with its plaque.20190218_150408 copy.jpg

Heaving spent a little time as a journalist in London he returned to Cornwall in 1891, and settled in Fowey. In addition to publishing a series of critical articles, he completed Robert Louis Stevenson’s unfinished novel, “St Ives”. He was also known as a writer of excellent verse and a compiler of poetic works, most notably the “Oxford Book of English Verse, 1250-1900”, which appeared in 1900. This book is often quoted by John Mortimer’s “Rumpole of the Bailey”.                                                                                                             Quiller-Couch was an active worker in local politics for the Liberal party. He was also Commodore of the Royal Fowey Yacht Club from 1911 until his death. He was knighted in 1910 and received a professorship of English at Cambridge in 1912. He retained this post for the remainder of his life. He later became Chair of English at the university and oversaw the beginnings of the English Faculty there.                                                               Many of Quiller-Couch’s fictional works have been long neglected but contain a wealth of Cornish folk lore. He was a noted literary critic, and published several volumes of criticism. He died in 1944, leaving his autobiography, “Memories and Opinions”, unfinished. This was published the following year. His novel, “Castle Dor” was also unfinished on Quiller-Couch’s death, and his daughter asked her friend Daphne du Maurier to complete this version of Tristan and Isolde, set in 19th century Cornwall.

Perranporth and other beaches on the North Coast…..

20190214_124516 copy.jpgWe were trying to find the beach we had visited when first in Cornwall that has a small boardwalk and freshwater pond in the dunes. We thought it might be Perranporth so that is where we headed. We were wrong. Perranporth is the beach with a good bar/restaurant right on the beach and ‘unofficial’ nude bathing at the far end. What a lovely February day, and no Photoshop here!20190214_131944-copy.jpeg20190214_125156 copy.jpeg20190214_130211 copy.jpgAt the far end, having encountered no nudes unfortunately, we climbed up the Coast Path to a viewing point. The bench was obviously constructed for Giants as you can see!20190214_130317 copy.jpg20190214_130346 copy.jpg20190214_130627 copy.jpeg20190214_131715 copy.jpgNext to Trevaunce Cove….never been here before and a quaint harbour and beach (mostly covered when we were there). A fascinating place indeed. 20190214_140951 copy.jpegMost of the Cove is designated as an SSI because of the interesting geology and exposed lodes, and the village of St Agnes just above here was famous for its high quality tin….the last mine closing in 1941. There were outcrops of pure tin on the beach itself which were worked at low tide, others running under the sea, and more in the cliff face. Some of the spoil is still visible on the cliff top…….This little cove in its time was a real hive of industrial activity with hammer mills, loading of ships and much else apart from the mines themselves. However over a period of almost 400 years five attempts were made at constructing a harbour…all failed due to the rough seas. Huge granite slabs just washed away. On of the attempts was by Winstanley of Eddystone lighthouse fame.20190214_142139 copy.jpgTrevaunce was also a fishery and the odd fishing boat remains as a reminder of the past…20190214_141529 copy.jpegWe climbed the cliffs and sat on the lowest bench I have come across (Guinness Book of Records?) to watch the surfers at play.20190214_142631 copy.jpeg20190214_142556 copy.jpgWe then adjourned to the Driftwood Spars pub and brewery for a pint. The name stems from the huge beams (or spars) that comprise its structure, salvaged from shipwrecks along the coast and utilised for the building in the 1650s. The pub began life as a tin mining warehouse and has since been a chandlery, sail making loft and fish cellar, before it was eventually  converted into a hotel and bar in the early 1900s.20190214_143638 copy.jpegSuitably refreshed off we went to have one more try at finding the elusive beach of memory. Success at last, it was Holywell Bay, just as charming as we remembered!…..with its freshwater pool and river…20190214_153615 copy.jpgnice little boardwalk….20190214_153339 copy.jpg20190214_153350 copy.jpgand beautiful dunes…..20190214_153543 copy.jpg20190214_153846 copy.jpegThe beach was pretty fantastic too…..20190214_154037 copy.jpeg20190214_154936 copy.jpegA lovely day by the seaside full of interest, and only 50 minutes away by car. Marvellous.

Landing craft in Looe, lunch in Fowey….

20190206_112454 copy.jpgOn our regular walk in Looe we saw a landing craft hover in the retreating sea outside Looe (the tide was almost at its lowest), and then make up its mind and beach. We have absolutely no idea what all this was about, but it did attract attention! Having then to take some garden rubbish to the tip we used the opportunity of going on a bit further to Fowey one of my all-time favourite places. We had lunch and a pint at the Ship Inn which we had never been in before – a traditional pub with roaring fire – perfect on a cold day.20190213_132916 copy.jpg20190213_132920.jpgAfter a nice stroll through town we climbed the steps to the hotel now renamed as The Fowey Harbour Hotel  where we had a coffee.  Part of a group, but with reasonable taste….20190213_145706 copy.jpgand great views from where we were sitting in the bar\lounge…..20190213_145711 copy.jpegthey seem to have copied the ‘wellies’ idea from Olga Polizzi’s Tresanton Hotel in St Mawes…..20190213_152432 copy.jpg

Lunch at Spires restaurant Truro….

20190204_134900.jpegHaving raved about the Truro and Penwith College restaurant in Penzance – Senara – we thought we would try their sister operation in Truro. “It’s run entirely by our Professional Cookery and Professional Food and Beverage students, who gain valuable experience whilst working towards their qualifications.” Three courses for £10…..you can’t go wrong. Here’s their sample lunch menu…

Example lunch menu

Spicy roast pumpkin and sweet potato soup.
Smoked mackerel tian with pickled cucumber and crostini.
Mozzarella with broad beans, mint, lemon, olive oil and pea shoots.

Slow roasted belly of pork on puy lentil and chorizo broth with curly kale.
Battered pollock with hand-cooked chips, crushed peas, pea puree and deconstructed tartar sauce.
Gnocchi with roasted vegetables, tomato sauce & pesto.

Autumn Eton Mess.
Lemon tart with clotted cream.
Cornish cheeses with chutney and oatcakes.

What I have to say is that although we would definitely recommend Spires- it is incredible value, and we would go there again, – it didn’t come anywhere near to the standard of Senara. Strange in one way as they are part of the same organisation, but then again the staff are different so I wonder whether that is where the difference lies. Do they sample each other’s fare? Perhaps not. At Senara it started with the bread beautifully made, tasty and a choice on offer. At Spires we were given white bread which wasn’t fully cooked through. And the different courses each had their small failings….salad not picked through, no dressing etc etc. Still we enjoyed ourselves. We then tootled off to Truro on the Park and Ride to spend my book token in Waterstone’s. Walking through Truro is always a pleasure with plenty of fine buildings and the streetscape is great. City Hall we noticed had closed – it is being converted into flats I believe. This was where the TI was located where we wanted to get some bus timetables, 20190204_154502 copy.jpegbut right opposite is the new TI which is really really good. here is a little seating area just as you enter…..very jolly!20190204_154643 copy.jpgJust to the left is the old ‘Coinage Hall’  so-called because of Truro’s past status as a Stannery. The current building is Victorian. 20190204_154714.jpgGranite cobbles and kerbstones impart a lot of character as does the leat system for water thought to be a system the Victorians used as for street cleansing and drinking water for horses.20190204_154843 copy.jpgTruro’s cathedral is obviously prominent in the town but on a day with cloudless skies it is magnificent.20190204_154903 copy.jpeg20190204_155140_001 copy.jpeg20190204_155158 copy.jpg20190204_155239 copy.jpgTruro is less than an hour by car for us so a great place to visit. The weather hasn’t all been blue skies as these recent pics of our garden show….20190131_162904 copy.jpg20190119_104607 copy.jpg20190119_104614 copy.jpgbut we like our walk along the local lanes whatever the weather, particularly just now when the wildflowers are starting to appear in the Cornish hedges….20190119_161038 copy.jpg20190119_163606 copy.jpg20190202_162206 copy.jpg

A Something and Nothing Walk……

20190107_122715.jpgLooking at our local map we saw that there was a potential new walk from Duloe, the next village to us. It did have some rather sharp contour lines, but looked promising. There are no public footpath walks from St Keyne, our village, which is a shame, although we do constantly walk along the lanes. Anyhow, off we set. First of all there were some rather lovely catkins decorating a few trees at the start of the walk. Then, after crossing the dry bed of a little stream….20190107_122924.jpgwe walked through an orchard which belongs to Cornish Orchards well-known now throughout the country for their cider and other drinks. We must return when the blossom is out, and then later see the apples themselves (maybe a bit of scrumping?). 20190107_122948.jpgWe descended sharply to the valley bottom through Duchy land to a little hamlet of holiday cottages. Unfortunately as we reached the road……. 20190107_124541.jpg…….someone yet again had blighted the landscape with uncaring dumping of litter. Who are these people? Well, on the way back up to Duloe on the lanes I noted a discarded outer of Carling Lager, and scattered for a mile or so along the hedgerow I counted about 10 cans of Carling. Idiots all these people.20190107_130525.jpgThere was a rather nice cottage on the way up which had a lovely rustic gateway which added to the view…..I do so like the gates and stiles and crossing points you see on country walks and often take pictures showing the huge differences in regional styles (not a pun!). I really would like to write a booklet for the Shire series of esoteric books. One day, perhaps.20190107_131356.jpg20190107_131550.jpgWe noted some wildflowers in bloom, and when we had finished our walk I drove to the edge of Duloe……. 20190107_131448.jpgto take a picture of a clump of daffodils that have been in flower since December…..this bank where they are is full of daffodils in Spring, so I am frankly amazed at this one clump with no sign whatsoever of any others….perhaps a very early variety anyhow.20190107_140349.jpgOther things are blossoming at this time in Cornwall…here a camellia and…… 20190101_130546.jpg….in our own garden this azalea has been in flower since at least early December, probably November.20190101_155343.jpgWell, we did our 8000 steps, but I don’t think we’ll be in too much of a hurry to do the walk again. It was a little uninspiring……